Monday, January 28, 2013

AAAWWEUBBIS




Although
After
As
When
While
Even though, even if
Until
Before
Because
If
Since

Copy this rule and a sample sentence into your composition book:

Rule: When an AAAWWEUBBIS  is placed at the beginning of a sentence, it causes a comma -- as in this sentence:

Although I love chocolate, I might refuse to eat a chocolate covered onion.
After a lovely meal of steak and tomatoes,  the best dessert is something sweet containing chocolate.
As I ate the chocolate cheesecake, I didn't feel guilty at all for not sharing.


What the formula for an AAAWWEUBBIS sentence? 

It's your turn to write out the formula for an AAAWWEUBBIS sentence.

Remember the formula for a compound sentence: 
IC, + coordinating conjunction + IC.












 


What, then, is the formula for an  AAAWWEUBBIS sentence? 


Sample Sentences: 
When Bertha talked, everyone listened.  

After we ate dinner, we played Monopoly.

Symbols to Use for the Formula: 

 IC = Independent Clause
 sc = subordinating conjunction (or   AAAWWEUBBIS) 

,

.

+   + 

= an AAAWWEUBBIS sentence




Formula:  








Formula for an AAAWWEUBBIS Sentence





Back to Wednesday/Thursday, February 20/21, 2013



This Sentence is an . . . . .







Back to Wednesday/Thursday, February 20/21, 2013

More QAR: Explanations for "Three Little Pigs" QARs


Examples from "The Three Little Pigs"   

Right There
 questions:
1. How many little pigs were there? (The answer is right there – in the title and in the story.)
2. What did the third little pig buy?  (The answer is right there in the sentence that says that he bought it.)

Think and Search
 questions:
3.  What were the three materials the little pigs used to build houses?
           (You have to look in more than one place for the three different items.)
4.  How many times in the whole story did the wolf huff and puff?
           (Again, you have to look in more than one place and add up how many times
                he huffed and puffed.)

Author and You questions: 
5.  Which little pig are you most like?  (You have to read the story to know about the little pigs, but you add to that what you know about yourself.)
6.  Do you think the the wolf in "The Story of the Three Little Pigs" deserves any sympathy? 
       (You have to know the story to know about the wolf in it, but you have to add your own judgment to that.)

On Your Own
 questions:  (You can answer these questions without ever reading this story.)
7.  Do you look forward to the day you leave home to live on your own? 
8.  Have you ever done a job poorly that you later wished you'd done better?

to  QAR's Question-Answer Relationships

Friday/Monday, February 1/4, 2013

Minimal Day

Time Period Minutes
8:15 – 9:15 1st Period 60 minutes
9:20 – 10:20 2nd Period/Announcements 60 minutes
10:20 – 10:45 First Lunch 25 minutes
10:50 – 11:50 3rd Period 60 minutes
10:25 – 11:25 3rd Period 60 minutes
11:25 – 11:50 Second Lunch 25 minutes
11:55 – 12:55 4th Period 60 minutes

B8: 
1.  iRead and reading log
2. Work on short stories -- about 10 minutes or so
You need your plot outline and about a half-page of rough draft.


3.  iRightWrite:    Simple Sentences   
  Simple Sentences

Because -- On the bubble sheet sentence test we took, 

the most-missed question was a two-word sentence. 

          Two word sentences and other short ones
                      Take notes
                      Take a quick quiz 
(B8:  Adverbs and Adjectives as needed)

Writing a Short Story (fictional narrative)  -- Computer Lab 211/MY Access!
Use the draft you began on Wednesday/Thursday.



If you did not finish typing your story during class, finish typing it into MYAccess! at home. 

Use your A.R.M.S. and "Fingers. "

Revision with ARMS
And Fingers for Writing with Sensory Images

If you will be absent, ask Ms. Dorsey for the assignment.


Extra Credit: Two Word Sentences



Wednesday/Thursday, January 30/31, 2013


Targets: 
  • Today you will practice creating complete sentences.  
  • You will work on writing a fictional short story that follows the plot map we have been studying by reading short stories.  You will also use figurative language in your story. 

1)  iRead and fill out reading log

2)  iWriteRight: 

Group Activity: Silly Sentences 
Class A4 completed this activity, but will repeat it. 

  1. Each person will receive a word.
  2. You will get together with three other people to create a sentence.
  3. Create a four-word sentence.
  4. You may trade words.
  5. You may use words from the left-over bank.
  6. Each sentence must be grammatically correct, but it doesn't have to make real sense. (It can be silly.) 
  7. We will imagine that each sentence will have a capital letter at the beginning and a period at the end. 
  8. Find a place around the perimeter of the room to line up with your sentence in order. The sentences will make a big circle around the room. 
  9. You have three minutes.
  10. After the teacher approves your sentence,  write your sentence (legibly) on the paper provided.  Work together as a group to find and mark the subject and verb in the sentence.   Underline the subject and circle the verb. 


Extra Credit: Two Word Sentences


_____________________________________________


3) Writing a Short Story (fictional narrative)  -- preparing and drafting   


Scary Story Drafting.doc
Create a plot outline for your story and write about a half-page or more of a rough draft.







If you will be absent, ask Ms. Dorsey for the assignment.


Monday/Tuesday, January 28/29, 2013



Targets: Today you will learn about and practice writing and REVISING. 
If time, you will also look at what makes a complete sentence ! 

If you haven't handed in your plot maps and reading guide for the short story, do it RIGHT AWAY. 



Pick up your composition book and a half-page exercise (in front of your black file crate).
1. iWriteRight:  Complete the Editing and Suggesting Revisions Exercise and tape it into your composition book. 
If you have extra time, use it for iRead. 

[In case you are absent, ask for (or print off) the iWrite, complete it and tape it into your composition book.  Editing and Suggesting Revisions.doc
In case you are absent, or otherwise miss reading time, please pick up a reading make-up log, complete the assignment for each day you miss, have a parent sign for each day you miss, bring it back to class, and staple it to your regular reading log.]

____________________________


the time we went two splash mountain

            We drove to california and went to disneyland  we got 

our tickets and went in.  We got on splash mountain  I felt 

nervous. When the ride started up  I got really nervous.  I could 

here people screaming.   I was really really really scared, but 

soon it was over.   i felt closer to my dad because of that.    

After that we went and ate hamburgers.   I ate alot of fries to.   

I will never forget that trip!!!!!!!


_____________________________________

2.  Instruction about Revision and Editing    Revision with ARMS

3. Revision Exercise:  Computer Lab 211  Bring a pencil or pen.
MyAccess Musical Chairs






[If you are absent, complete the prompt on MyAccess.
See the document to download.
Revise and submit three times:
    Once for A.R.M.S.  Revision with ARMS
    Once for "Fingers"  And Fingers for Writing with Sensory Images
    Again to carefully edit for conventions (punctuation, spelling, capitalization, etc.) ]




__________________________________________________
4. If there is time --  Group Activity:  Silly Sentences 
Class A4 completed this activity.

  •  Each person will receive a word.
  • You will get together with three other people to create a sentence.
  • Create a four-word sentence.
  • You may trade words.
  • You may use words from the left-over bank.
  •  Each sentence must be grammatically correct, but it doesn't have to make real sense. (It can be silly.) 
  •  We will imagine that each sentence will have a capital letter at the beginning and a period at the end. 
  • Find a place around the perimeter of the room to line up with your sentence in order.  The sentences will make a big circle around the room.  
  • You have three minutes.
or 4. If extra time, you may play Grammar Punk.  You'll need a page in your composition book to keep your score.

Grammar Punk: My Points!
Date
Points













Extra Credit: Two Word Sentences


Revision with ARMS

Self-Starter:  

1.     Mark this passage to show editing corrections that should be made.  (There are about 22.)
2.     List below ways the student who wrote this could revise it to make it better. 

the time we went two splash mountain
            We drove to california and went to disneyland  we got our tickets and went in.
We got on splash mountain  I felt nervous. When the ride started up  I got really nervous.  I could here people screaming.   I was really really really scared, but soon it was over.   i felt closer to my dad because of that.    After that we went and ate hamburgers.   I ate alot of fries to.   I will never forget that trip!!!!!!!
The student could make this better by. . . . 

http://disneyland.disney.go.com/disneyland/splash-mountain/

_________________________________ 

  • Remember that MyAccess does not like contractions, so do not use them.

  • Remember that MyAccess does like it when you use words from the prompt in your essay.

  • MyAccess likes it when you use paragraphs -- several paragraphs.

  • MyAccess likes it when you use transitions.   As a result,. .  .   Finally, . . .  In addition to, . . . .   See the chart in the computer lab.

  • MyAccess likes it when your story has a beginning, a middle, and an end.

  • MyAccess likes it when you use description and dialogue.

    ___________________________________ 

Bring your ARMS and fingers   

A.R.M.S. Revision Strategy

And Fingers for Writing with Sensory Images

  

_____________________________



    this post originally published 3/27/12

    Thursday, January 24, 2013

    Extra Credit Opportunity -- Earn "Swiftly"



    TOM SWIFTIES are a special type of pun, containing what we word dorks know is an adverb of manner. I included a bunch my book, "The Laugh Stand; Adventures in Humor." These scissors are dull, Tom said bluntly. This sure is flat land, Tom said plainly. These are my underpants, Tom said briefly.

    Bring in up to five Tom Swifties for two points each -- up to ten points extra credit.   These must be neatly legible, and if you got them from a book or online source, please give credit to your source. 

    Wednesday, January 23, 2013

    Extra Credit: Two Word Sentences


    Earn extra credit by finding two word sentences in published books.  You must show where you found them.  Bring them in, copy them as directed, and receive 2 points each for up to five sentences.

    To hand them in, you should have for each this information:
    1. Title of Book or other Source
    2. Author
    3. Page (or other information about where you found it)
    4.  The two word sentence with subject underlined and verb circled.

    Make sure you own name is on the paper so your teacher will be able to give you credit.

    The Truth About Sentences


    •  Sentences must have a subject and a verb.

    •  The sentence questions are the following:

              Who or what did or is something? (subject)

              What did they do?  or What are they? (verb)


    • Fragments are missing either a subject or a verb.

    Don't let these confuse you:
     •    A capital letter and period do not make a sentence a sentence. 

                     (However, you do need them to make a sentence correct.)

    •  Beware the  " -ing." 
           That thing that looks like a verb that ends in "-ing" is not acting as a verb unless it has a helping (auxiliary) verb with it.    

    Students editing (not a sentence) 
    vs. students edit ( a sentence)

    *List Of Helping Verbs:
    am, are, is, was, were, be, being, been
    have, has, had
    shall, will
    do, does, did
    may, must, might
    can, could, would, should




    See more information on the dangerous "-ing" here: 

    What is a Helping (Auxiliary) Verb?



    Now, the challenge!    
    Because -- On the bubble sheet sentence test we took, 
    the most-missed question was a two-word sentence. 
    Two Word Wonder
    Number the page in your composition book from one through 11.
    For each of the following answer 
         S for sentence or F for fragment 

    1. He paced.

    2. And mosquitoes.

    3. Stacy gasped.

    4. Eric stirred.

    5. And gnats.

    6. Another corpse.

    7. Jeff shrugged.

    8. Amy turned.

    9. To look.

    10. Jeff nodded.

    11. Jeff sighed.

              S for sentence or F for fragment 

      -- Scott Smith, The Ruins (2006)


    Answers for Two Word Wonder



    (Thanks to Jeff Anderson!) 


    Extra Credit: Two Word Sentences


    Back to   Simple Sentences

    Tuesday, January 22, 2013

    This is No-Name-Calling Week


    The Function of Education

    The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character - that is the goal of true education. 
    Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Monday, January 21, 2013

    QAR's from Historical Fiction Books


    Elijah of Buxton   -- Questions created by Garret H. and Juana B.
    Would you have put the toady-frog in the basket?   Author and You
    Do you like fishing?   On Your Own
    Who is Elijah's best friend?   Right There (?)

    Woods Runner  -- Questios by Scott, Carson, Cinnamon, and Jaeden
    How old was Samuel?  Right There
    What was Samuel's childhood like?   Think and Search
    Have you ever been hunting on your own?  On Your Own
    Will anyone help him?   Think and Search





    Formula for an AAAWWEUBBIS Sentence


               Dependent clause
    Subordinating conjunction + IC, + IC.  





    Sentence:  When the class was quiet, Gooney Bird began her Monday story.
       -- Lois Lowry, Gooney Bird Greene (2002)







    (or  if the subordinating conjunction is in the middle of the sentence)

                     Dependent clause
    IC + subordinating conjuntion + IC




    Model

    Back to Wednesday/Thursday, February 20/21, 2013

    Friday, January 18, 2013

    Thursday/Friday, January 24/25, 2013

    Targets:  By the end of the period you will 
    a. better understand figurative language
    b. better understand how to recognize a  complete sentence. 

    If you haven't handed in your plot maps and reading guide for the short story, do it RIGHT AWAY. 


    1.  Pick up your composition book.

    2.  iShow-What-I-Know:  Take a quiz on complete sentences. 
              Pick up a test and your own scantron sheet. 
              Carefully read the directions and questions.
              Mark your answers on the scantron. 
              Do not make any stray marks on the scantron.
              Bring your scantron up to the teacher to scan. 

    3.  iLearn/iRead
              If your score on your test was an 8 or above, you may read your choice of materials. 
              If your score on your test was below an 8, carefully study the page available about complete sentences. 
      
    4.  Quiz on Protagonist and Antagonist 

    The Bronte Sisters and Zombies?  
    5. Review of Figurative Language (take notes) and iCompete.
    A1/A3 Finished 
    A4 "through writhed in a horrible curtain," then played again. 

    6.  iLearn: More on Sentences 
              a.  Review of sentence "rules"
              b. 

     Group Activity:  Silly Sentences
    Class A4 completed this activity.

    •  Each person will receive a word.
    • You will get together with three other people to create a sentence.
    • Create a four-word sentence.
    • You may trade words.
    • You may use words from the left-over bank.
    •  Each sentence must be grammatically correct, but it doesn't have to make real sense. (It can be silly.) 
    •  We will imagine that each sentence will have a capital letter at the beginning and a period at the end. 
    • Find a place around the perimeter of the room to line up with your sentence in order.  The sentences will make a big circle around the room.  
    • You have three minutes.
    7. If extra time, play Grammar Punk.  You'll need a page in your composition book to keep your score.



    Grammar Punk: My Points!
    Date
    Points















    Extra Credit: Two Word Sentences


    Tuesday/Wednesday, January 22/23, 2013

    Targets:  By the end of the period you will know what protagonists and antagonists are,  will better understand the types of conflict in literature,
    and will better understand several types of figurative language. 

    Next time you should be able to (on your own) recognize protagonists and antagonists and some examples of figurative language.

    Announcements and Reminders:  Hand in your plot maps for "Rikki-tikki-tavi" and "Smallest Dragon Boy" if you haven't yet.

    1. iRead:  
    Pick up a new reading log and your composition book.  
    Today you may read your choice of reading materials.  
    Individual Reading Time and Fill Out Your Reading Log.

    2.  iCalendar:  New Pair-Ups 

    3. iWrite: The Good Guys and the Bad Guys   January 22/23, 2013
                             (Protagonists and Antagonists)  
    Make  four columns, and fill in as many sets as you can:


    Title of a
    book, story, movie, TV show
    the good guy(s)
    (protagonists)
    the bad guy(s)
    (antagonists)
    Type of Conflict *
    The Three Little Pigs
    The Pigs
    The Wolf
    Man vs. Man
    Rikki-tikki-tavi




    The Smallest Dragon Boy




    Three Skeleton Key





     Now add as 

    many of your 

     own as you

    can think of.

    *Types of Conflict:
    Man vs. Man,  Man vs. Self,  Man vs. Society, Man vs. Nature, Man vs. the Supernatural, Society vs. Society 

    4.   Pair Share -- literally.  You may copy the ones you like from your partner's chart.  



    5.  iRead and iLearn:  
    Take out your reading guide for  "Three Skeleton Key"  (32 minutes)
    page 65
    Follow the directions on the Reading Guide. 
    • Finish listening to and reading along with the short story, 
    • “Three Skeleton Key” by George C. Toudouze.
    • Follow the directions on the Reading Guide.

    To answer question c., see page 68, paragraphs 4-5 and page 73, paragraph 2. 

    A1  15:02  end of second paragraph on page 71  "every rat leaped to attack. . " to end.
    A3  15:21  end of third paragraph on page 71 "bronze set in granite"
    A4  16:16  bottom of page 71, 1st column, ended at "prisoners of a horde of starving rats" 
    B7  21:08  page 73, column 1, to fifth paragraph

    B8  24:44  page 74, to the last paragraph  


    If you are absent, you can read the story here. 
    Here is the reading guide we used today.  Download it by clicking here: 
    Three Skeleton Key Reading Guide.doc

    5.   iLearn and Compete:  Figurative Language 
    In groups you will race to find figurative language in the short story we just read. 

    If you were absent, you can view the PowerPoint about several types of figurative language:

    Figurative Language for Blog.ppt    

    A1 viewed the PowerPoint, but did not play the game.
    A3  viewed the PowerPoint, but did not play the game.
    A4  viewed the PowerPoint, and did one slide of the game. 





    If you're feeling behind:
    Use the links on these posts to read the stories if you missed them, or to reread them for understanding. Use the links to download the assignments.  
    Hand in your plot maps for "Rikki-tikki-tavi" and "Smallest Dragon Boy."  
    Study how a plot works, using this example plot map. 
    Plot for Rikki-tikki-tavi (1).doc