Thursday, April 28, 2011

April 28, 2011

State Core Testing  -- Come rested and nourished and with a clear bottle of water.


Each day bring a book to read after you've handed in your test!   This should be your contemporary realistic fiction book unless you've finished it and the assignments related to it.  

test_taking_tips.pdf

We did some reading from Stand Tall by Joan Bauer.

Originally posted April 16, 2011.

Extra Credit

If you can tell me what biannual, semiannual, and biennial mean, you'll earn 5 points of extra credit.

‎"Biannual" and "semiannual" each mean "twice yearly." "Biennial" means "every two years." Reason #273 to be grateful if you didn’t have to learn English as a second language.
 
 
 

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

State Core Testing  -- Come rested and nourished and with a clear bottle of water.

Each day bring a book to read after you've handed in your test!   This should be your contemporary realistic fiction book unless you've finished it and the assignments related to it.  

Today we had enough time to just begin reading Stand Tall by Joan Bauer.

Reminder:  Don't forget to hand in your three papers for the April Book-of-the-Month assessment.  If you need more explanations and examples, there are handouts with the extra copies of the assignments in the folders at the back of our classroom.

Originally published 4/16/11

test_taking_tips.pdf

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Reminder of Term 4 Targets

Book-of-the-Month:  Sign up for your book by April 7.  Be half-way through reading it or so by April 18, and bring it to class all that week and the next so you are prepared to do some in-class activities with the book.  The book for this time should be contemporary realistic fiction: a novel that could happen in our time, but is a fictional (made-up) story.  Select a book that has 100 pages or more and that you have not read before.  

Contemporary Realistic Fiction 

Reminder of Term 4 Targets  -- You received this list in class on March 30.
    We will be taking the State Core Test this term (the last week of April).  Improve your score by reviewing and learning these items.
To download and print this list, click on the link here:
Preview of Term 4 Targets.doc
  1. Review prefixes and suffixes and associated words.  Prefixes and Suffixes Chart 2010 
  2. Test your knowledge of external text features
External Text Features:   Examples of External Text Features
Make sure you can recognize 
captions  (tell you about photos, pictures, other illustrations)
graphs and charts  -- a graph is a drawing illustrating the relations between certain quantities plotted with reference to a set of axes -- http://dictionary.kids.net.au/word/graph
tables -  A table presents information in rows and columns.
table of contents -- found at the beginning of a book, it is a list of divisions (chapters or articles) and the pages on which they start
index -- (in a nonfiction book, monograph, etc.) a more or less detailed alphabetical listing of names, places, and topics along with the numbers of the pages on which they are mentioned or discussed, usually at the back of the book. -- dictionary.com
glossary -- 1.  a list of terms in a special subject, field, or area of usage, with accompanying definitions.

2.  such a list at the back of a book, explaining or defining difficult or unusual words and expressions used in the text. -- dictionary.com
titles -- the distinguishing name of a book, poem, picture, piece of music, or the like. -- dictionary.com
headings -- a main division, as of a  book, lecture, speech, essay, etc. -- http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-definition/heading
subheadings --   Subheadings are titles that divide part of a piece of writing into shorter sections. -- http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-cobuild/sub-heading
bolded words  -- (also called bold face)   a weight of type characterized by thick heavy lines -- http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-definition/bolded

    external text feature test.ppt  This is the test we already took. 

  1. Review commonly confused words.  confused words chart.doc
  2. Using Apostrophes to Show Possession

  3. Lie and Lay 

    Lie and Lay

  4. Internal Text Structures   

    chronological, sequence, description 

    Slide show from April 1 ( internal text structures.ppt ) for -- 
    Descriptive   Description Internal Text Structure
    Chronological  Chronological Internal Text Structure
    Sequence   Sequence Internal Text Structure

  5. Main Idea, Important Details,  Summarizing

         Also writing paragraphs:  Transition Word List from Ms John.doc

    Play some very simple games with recognizing main idea: http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/mainideap2.cfm 

    http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/mainideap3.cfm   

    http://www.quia.com/pop/120023.html?AP_rand=109711560

     

  6. Writing complete, correct sentences, and how to fix sentence fragments and achieve sentence variety.    Clauses and "Is it a complete sentence?"

    9.  Using context clues of definition and explanation to figure out what a word means.

            Context Clues for Seventh Grade

    10.  Review commas in a series.  

    Example:  The orange highlighted part shows commas in a series.

    "Adverbs, words that describe or add information to verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs, should be used sparingly."  

           For more information on Parts of Speech, go to  Parts of Speech.

    Game with Commas in a Series

    Remember this?   Commas in a Series -- What's Different?

    11.  Review parts of a story: exposition, rising action, climax, and falling action. 

    12.  Review how we learn about a character in a story:  through his or her speech, actions, appearance, thoughts, and through what others say about that character.  

    13.  Review figurative language used in writing, especially simile and metaphor. 

    Glossary of Literary Terms

    Narrator in Literature

    14.  Consider more how to choose the best word to use by recognizing shades of meaning.  

    Is the water she spilled on her lap tepid, warm, hot, or scalding?  That would make a difference! 

    Is that person you're going to the jewelry store with your friend,  your helper, or your accomplice.  That could make a difference to you, and, in the case of the last word, to the police! They're all people you could hang out with, but have different shades of meaning.

    Shades of Meaning

    15.  Review effective research and reporting (inquiry), including asking questions, using reference books and reliable sources, and using informal citation.

    16.  We'll also look at more poetry and at author's and reader's purpose.   

     

    Here is a link about narrator:   Narrator in Literature

    And here are some links about theme:

    More About Theme

    Topic and Theme

    Another example of Theme

    Examples of Theme from Movies

    Student Examples for Themes

    More Examples of Theme from Students

     Student Example for Essay about Theme

     

    Links about simile and metaphor: 

    Figurative Language

    Chart for Examples and Non-Examples of Simile and Metaphor

     

    And here are more links about simile and metaphor:

    http://www.buzzle.com/articles/examples-of-similes.html

     

    Using strong verbs:

    Verbs -- Strong and Weak

     


     

     

    Originally published in March, 2011

April 22, 2011

Happy Birthday tomorrow to William Shakespeare!   

Bell-ringer:  Part 3 of the Contemporary Realistic Fiction Novel -- about themes.   Theme Assessment 7th grade.doc

If you don't quite get theme, study these helps:


More About Theme


Topic and Theme

Another example of Theme

Examples of Theme from Movies

Student Examples for Themes

More Examples of Theme from Students

 Student Example for Essay about Theme

__________________________________________________________
Apostrophes and More 
In your composition book, copy the first sentence, then number one through four and tell what is different for each other sentence.


How'd They Do It?
 Model Sentence:
It's  so dark you can't see your hand in front of your face, let alone the other men around you.  You're loaded down with nearly 100 pounds of weapons, food, and equipment.
   -- Simone Payment, Navy Seals: Special Operations for the U.S. Navy (Inside Special Operations)  (2003)
What is the difference in each of these sentences that is ALMOST like the one above?
1. Its  so dark you can't see your hand in front of your face, let alone the other men around you.  You're loaded down with nearly 100 pounds of weapons, food, and equipment.

2. It's  dark.   You're  loaded down with nearly 100 pounds of weapons, food, and equipment.

3. It's  so dark you can't see your hand in front of your face, let alone the other men around you.  Your loaded down with nearly 100 pounds of weapons, food, and equipment.

4. It's  so dark you can't see your hand in front of your face, let alone the other men around you.  You're loaded down with nearly 100 pounds of weapons food, and equipment.
________________________________
 Core Test  Practice
Reading passages -- nonfiction and fiction
Poetry
Etc.

Special Note:  "Omit" means "leave out."
A3 answered some questions about poetry.

Retake the SRI -- Scholastic Reading Inventory Test
Computer Lab: SRI Test -- Lab 223 -- Do not print.


Reminder:  Next week we will be taking the State Core Language Arts Test.  Please come to school rested and having eaten a nutritious breakfast, and bring a clear water bottle -- all of which you should do everyday anyway!

April 20, 2011

Bell-Ringer:  Individual reading for your contemporary realistic novel -- and filling out a sheet about the use of language (simile, metaphor, sensory images, strong verbs) in your novel.
Contempory Novel 2.doc
Here is a link about simile and metaphor:   Figurative Language
and another:  Chart for Examples and Non-Examples of Simile and Metaphor

Here is a link giving examples of strong and weaker verbs:   Verbs -- Strong and Weak
 
And here are some good examples of the types of passages you will look for in your book:
Simile:
"He  [felt] a throbbing like a snake slithering in and out of the tendons in his left leg."  -- Kim Russon writing Giver Chapt 24, 2/4/03

Another sample simile:  from Heat by Mike Lupica, pg 3
"He . . . saw the fat cop. . . wobbling like a car with a fat tire. . . . "

Description:
The zookeeper pointed at the smallest and darkest of the chimpanzees in the cage.  It was unkempt, thin, and solitary, with twigs, dry leaves, and bits of fruit in its fur, and a forlorn expression.   

Strong Verbs rather than weak ones:  
 scrubbed instead of cleaned in "We cleaned the toilets."
stomped or slunk or slid instead of walked in "He walked into the room." 



2.  More apostrophes and imitating a sentence -- in your composition book.

What do these sentences have in common with the sentences we looked at last time?


 A great scar in the earth's crust runs for almost 600 mines (960 km) along the coast of California.  This is the San Andreas Fault, where the Pacific plate slowly grinds along the North American plate.
   --- Andrew Langley, Hurricanes, Tsunamis, and Other Natural Disasters (2006)

Matilda's wonderfully subtle mind was already at work devising yet another suitable punishment for a poisonous parent. 
-- Roald Dahl, Matilda (1998)

Locals say if you go up to "Jacob's Hill," stop on a bridge, put your car in neutral, and turn everything off, your car will roll across the bridge.
   -- Wesley Treat, Heather Shad, and Rob Riggs, Weird Texas (2005)

Alan Ferko's face turned as red as Bo Peep's pigtail ribbons.  -- Jerry Spinelli, Stargirl (2000)
 


it's vs. its  (also "Showing rather than telling")
It’s an ugly Christmas tree.  Its color makes me sick.
Notice what a difference effective detail and description makes.  What is the difference between these two versions of the same sentiment?
“I don't like her Christmas tree at all.”  and  
     “Don't even get me started about my Aunt Rose's Christmas tree.  First of all, it's aluminum.  Second of all, it's pink.  I mean, like the color of PeptoBismol, which makes sense, because I get sick to my stomach just looking at it.”   -- Neal Shusterman, The Schwa Was Here (2006)

To Imitate:  Label  in your compostion book, “To Imitate.”  Copy and imitate this sentence:
Tally's eyes searched desperately for any sign of iron or steel in the cliff. 
-- Scott Westerfield, Uglies (2005)

sample imitations from Jeff Anderson: 
Ellen's eyes darted back and forth as she desperately hoped I'd drop some of my popcorn on the floor.
 Andrew's eyes searched the cafeteria for his girlfriend.  Back and forth went his brown eyes. She had disappeared. 
-- Anderson's student Miranda.
__(Pronoun or noun)__'s  ____(noun)___ ____(verb)____ etc.


3.  Practice Core Test Stuff.

Test Practice --
A1 --done and corrected through Section C
A2 --  through C,  B checked
A3 -- working on B and C -- not checked. -- Tried out lie/lay game with mild success.
A4 -- corrected A,  worked on B and C --  tried out lie/lay game with a tiny bit better success.

_______________________________________
Lie/Lay -- More Examples
The Verb "Lay"
Jerry lays the newspaper carefully by the door.   or The carriers lay the newspaper. . . .
Yesterday Jerry laid the newspaper by the door.
Jerry has laid the newspaper by the door everyday for the past year.  He deserves a generous tip.
Jerry will lay the newspaper by the door.
Jerry is laying the newspaper by the door.

The Verb "Lie"
Right now,  Cindy lies on the beach.  or The girls lie on the beach.
Yesterday Cindy lay on the beach for two hours.
Cindy has lain on the beach for at least an hour everyday for the past two weeks.
Cindy will lie on the beach again tomorrow.
Cindy is lying on the beach.  I wonder if she reads books while she's lying there. 


__________________________

Reminder:  Next week we will be taking the State Core Language Arts Test.  Please come to school rested and having eaten a nutritious breakfast, and bring a clear water bottle -- all of which you should do everyday anyway!

Watch for a retake- test on external test features after core testing.
Download the PowerPoint about External Text Features:    external text feature test.ppt
Examples of External Text Features

April 18, 2011

Bell-Ringer: Individual Reading for your contemporary realistic novel -- and fill out the sheet about narrator, character, setting, conflict.  If you didn't get it done in class, it is homework.

Contempory Novel 1.doc

Narrator in Literature

 

2.  What do you notice?

What Do You Notice? April 18, 2011


3.  Begin Practice Core Test.

Sorry, but I will not be able to do this on Wednesday morning since I have a meeting I must attend. I will be available Wednesday after school. 
Important:  I will be here before school at 7:15 on Wednesday the 20th and after school on Wednesday the 20th for those people who missed the District Writing Test to take the test.


Reminder:  Next week we will be taking the State Core Language Arts Test.  Please come to school rested and having eaten a nutritious breakfast, and bring a clear water bottle -- all of which you should do everyday anyway!   test_taking_tips.pdf

If you haven't signed up for your Book-of-the-Month, you need to do that right away!  Also, bring your book all this week and next.   We will be completing some assignments with your books in class each day this week.  (If you have finished reading it, bring another book to read next week in case you finish your testing section early.)  



__________________________________________
Elements of literature
Main idea
lie-lay
apostrophes
review of commonly confused words, etc.
Using Reference works -- Dictionaries, etc.

Another Contemporary Realistic Fiction Book

This one is probably more aimed at girls.  
The Book of One Hundred Truths

The Book of One Hundred Truths

by Julie Schumacher

"I should probably mention something right now before this story goes any further: my name is Theodora Grumman, and I am a liar."
It's hard for Thea to write four truths a day in the notebook her mother gave her for the summer. Especially when her grandparents' house on the Jersey Shore is even more packed with family than usual, and her cousin Jocelyn wont leave her alone. Jocelyn just might be the world's neatest and nosiest seven-year-old, and she wants to know what's in Thea's notebook. But Thea won't tell anyone about the secret she has promised to keep—or how she lost her best friend (Truth #12), whose name was Gwen.
Now Thea has to babysit in the afternoons, and all Jocelyn wants to do is spy on people. Neither of them expect to see Aunt Ellen and Aunt Celia at the boardwalk in the middle of the day, or for their aunts to lie and insist they were at work. Could it be Thea's not the only one in the family keeping secrets this summer?  -- Goodreads review

Another Fun Book

     I don't know if you've seen the cover for the novel The Godfather.  It's a very famous book, and a very famous movie was based on it.  In fact, I think there was a second Godfather movie, too -- and the third?  I've never read the book or seen the movies because I think I'm still not old enough for them -- too much adult content, I hear.  However,  there is a new book out that I -- and you -- are old enough for.  It's not really about the mafia, but . . . . .

     Mac and Vince may work outside the law (or rather, school rules), but they can get you pretty much whatever you need -- for a price.  You can find Mac's office in the East Wing boy's bathroom, fourth stall from the high window. 

"The Fourth Stall has so much going for it: sports crazed boys, friendship, bullies, middle school drama, hijinks, a crime ring, just to name a few issues it touches on, all with this noir-lite Humphrey Bogart Jr. style. A middle school read…dare we say it.. overflowing with friendship and heart,  it keeps you laughing as the mystery deepens."  from http://brimeetsbooks.com/?p=3597

    The cover is a clever adaptation of that cover I mentioned above.  I just bought The Fourth Stall, and hope to get it covered and ready for check-out very soon. 

Books about Autism and Aspergers

I just read Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine.  It's a novel told in first person by a girl with Aspberger's syndrome.  It is also about individuals and a community trying to heal from terrible loss.   It has been recommended for students in 4th through 7th grade, though I think 4th grade is a bit young, and that older students and adults would also enjoy reading it.

This is a link to a list of  books about autism.  


Anything But Typical is also told in first person.   When I read it, I felt that maybe it helped me better understand what life is like for a person with autism.


These are contemporary realistic fiction.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnVPbq8EpHE
http://www.pbs.org/search/?q=neurotypical

Friday, April 15, 2011

What Do You Notice? April 18, 2011


In your composition book, do the following: 

Title: What do you notice?
What do you notice about these sentences?  Copy the four sentences (with their authors), and then write about three things you notice about them.  What you notice could be about individual sentences or about all of them.
1.  Harold's eyes were glued to the floor.  He couldn't look.
2.  Harold is in the principal's office.  
  --Dav Pilkey, Captain Underpants and the Preposterous Plight of the Potty People (2006)
3.  Spelda tousled her son’s thick, black hair.
  -- Paul Stewart and Chris Riddle, The Edge Chronicles: Beyond the Deep Woods (1999)

4.  Mac’s office is located in the East Wing boys’ bathroom, fourth stall from the high window.
-- Chris Rylander, The Fourth Stall



And notice this --
Students need to know this about apostrophes:
Apostrophes show possession or contraction.
•    An apostrophe s added to a singular noun shows possession.
•   An apostrophe after the s in a plural word shows possession.
•    Apostrophes also show where letters were removed.
•    Words shortened with apostrophes are called contractions.

Misunderstandings you may need to get straight in your head:
•    Not just  any word that ends with an s needs an apostrophe
•    Relying on chance rather than meaning with the apostrophe
•    Using apostrophes to show pronoun possession  -- Don't!   For example, in "its" and "yours."
               The dog gnawed on its bone.
               That jacket must be yours.


Note:  It's a matter of style whether you write  1800's or 1800s.







Thursday, April 14, 2011

For You Fans of Twilight. . . and Peeps

The Washington Post runs a contest each year called "Peeps Show," and this is one of the entries.  See this year's winners at http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/peeps-show-v/2011/04/11/AF3NYHSD_gallery.html#photo=1
Warning: There are changing ads on this site. 

Can You Identify These Punctuation Marks?

Funny

Many words have more than one meaning -- and that's the source of much of our humor.  A pun may be the lowest form of humor, but it sure can be funny!


A pun is the lowest form of humor, unless you thought of it yourself. 

- Doug Larson

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

See More -- Observe!

Here's an interesting site (and sight).  It's a webcam on an eagle's nest.
http://www.ustream.tv/decoraheagles#utm_campaigne=synclickback&source=http://www.raptorresource.org/falcon_cams/decorah_eagle_xcel.html&medium=3064708

S.M.A.R.T.

Be S.M.A.R.T.!

See
More.                    Observe, notice, pay attention -- to the world around you, to other people.
Act
Responsibly.           Do what you ought to be doing when and where you ought to be doing it.       
Think.                    Use that wonderful mind of yours to learn, to learn more, to make decisions.

 C. Dorsey 4-5-11

Extra Credit

Extra Credit opportunity:  

Memorize one or more of these quotations:

Joy in looking and comprehending is nature's most beautiful gift.  4  points
Albert Einstein

The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched - they must be felt with the heart.   5 points
Helen Keller

For beautiful eyes, look for the good in others; for beautiful lips, speak only words of kindness; and for poise, walk with the knowledge that you are never alone.  -- 7 points
Audrey Hepburn 

quotes from http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/keywords/beautiful_2.html
____________________________
  
More extra credit:  Tell me why  "lb" is the abbreviation for pound.
WORD NERDERY: Why is “lb” the abbreviation for pound? It’s short for the Latin word libra, which was the balance scales used for weighing. The basic Roman unit of weight was called the libra pondo; libra means "scales or balances," while pondo is from pendere, meaning "to weigh."
Originally published Dec. 2010

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Examples of External Text Features




Glossary  (See also this  Glossary of Literary Terms)

Headings

Footnotes are found at the "foot" of the page.  A small "superscript" number in the main text matches the number by the note at the bottom of the page.






Table of Contents


An INDEX



The CAPTION tells us that the painting is called "The Giant and the Pigmies" and that it is by John E. Whiting.  A caption explains the picture or other illustration.




Lie and Lay


LAY - Lay must have a direct object. One lays something down.  (Transitive)

(Hint: substitute "put." If "put" works, then "lay" is also correct.)
 
Conjugation of LAY:
lay (present tense)
laid (past tense)
will lay (future tense)
laid (perfect tense) (use with have, had, has)


Examples: 
lay
http://www.grammar-quizzes.com/lie-lay.html
I lay the book on the desk.      
Yesterday I laid the book on the desk.
I was laying the book on the desk.
I have laid the book on the desk.

 

LIE -To lie down is an act that can be attributed to the subject.   (Intransitive)
There is no object of this verb, as the subject is doing the action without a receiver.
(Hint: substitute "recline." If "recline" works, then "lie" is also correct)
 

Conjugation of LIE:
lie (present tense)
lay (past tense)
will lie (future tense)
lain (perfect tense) (use with have, had, has)
 
Examples: 
http://bodyweightworkout.wordpress.com/
lie
I lie on the grass.     
Yesterday I lay on the grass.    
I was lying on the grass.     
I have lain on the grass.




_______________________________________

Lie/Lay -- More Examples
The Verb "Lay"
Jerry lays the newspaper carefully by the door.   or The carriers lay the newspaper. . . .
Yesterday Jerry laid the newspaper by the door.
Jerry has laid the newspaper by the door everyday for the past year.  He deserves a generous tip.
Jerry will lay the newspaper by the door.
Jerry is laying the newspaper by the door.

The Verb "Lie"
Right now,  Cindy lies on the beach.  or The girls lie on the beach.
Yesterday Cindy lay on the beach for two hours.
Cindy has lain on the beach for at least an hour everyday for the past two weeks.
Cindy will lie on the beach again tomorrow.
Cindy is lying on the beach.  I wonder if she reads books while she's lying there. 


__________________________

Lie/Lay activity

LIE -To lie down is an act that can be attributed to the subject.
There is no object of this verb, as the subject is doing the action without a receiver.
(Hint: substitute "recline." If "recline" works, then "lie" is also correct)
 
Conjugation of LIE:
lie (present tense)
lay (past tense)
will lie (future tense)
lain (perfect tense) (use with have, had, has)
lying

Examples:
As I lie in the grass looking up at the sky, I see a blue dragon flying eastward.

Yesterday as I lay in the grass looking up in the sky, I saw a blue dragon flying eastward.

I will lie in the grass tomorrow, looking for the dragon to fly by again.

I have lain in the grass for three weeks, and haven't seen the blue dragon again.  I have seen only yellow, red, and green dragons. 

I have been lying in the grass so much, my clothes have all turned green. 



LAY - Lay must have a direct object. One lays something down.
(Hint: substitute "put." If "put" works, then "lay" is also correct.)
 
Conjugation of LAY:
lay (present tense)
laid (past tense)
will lay (future tense)
laid (perfect tense) (use with have, had, has)
laying  

As I lay the blood-encrusted sword under my desk, Mr. Farnsworth walks into the classroom and asks me to come to the office.

The last time I laid my sword under my desk, no one noticed it there.

Next time I fight a battle before school, I will lay my sword in a safe, hidden place.

In the past I have laid my sword under a bush when I saw Mr. Green coming.

I was laying my  sword under the bush when Mr. Dalley stepped up behind me. 

Disclaimer:  Students, do not bring your swords to school, even if you have been in a battle with a dragon that morning.

Learn about tenses at http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/grammar/tenses.html#present%20perfect   


Saturday, January 24, 2009


Using the Irregular Verbs Lie and Lay 

The verbs lay and lie:
verb              meaning     forms: 1. present, 2, present participle (with helping verb), 3. past, 4. past participle (with helping verb)
"lay" means "to place"   forms:   1. lay, 2, laying,  3. laid, 4. laid
"lie" means "to recline"  forms: 1. lie, 2. lying, 3. lay, 4. lain

Notes on Lie/Lay Confusions

Lay, laid, laid  = to place   -- Notice that this verb takes a direct object.  That means it is acting on an object.  In the following sentences the object is the book.

Present tense (happening right now):  I __________ the book on my desk. (lay)
Past tense (happened in the past): Yesterday I __________ the book on my desk.  (laid)
Past participle (has happened in the past and may still be happening):
       I have _________ that book on my desk every day for a week.  (laid)

Lie, lay, lain = to recline   -- Notice that this verb does not take a direct object.  It is not doing something to an object. 
Present tense:  I ___________ on the couch right now.   (lie)
Past tense: Yesterday I __________ on the couch.  (lay)
Past participle:  I have ___________ on the couch every day for a week.  (lain)
 

Using the Irregular Verbs Lie and Lay  -- See this post for more information.

 Practice: (If you were absent, copy this, complete it, and hand it in.)
For each of these sentences tell whether the verb past, present, future, or perfect.
Then change the verb to the correct lie or lay verb.


Harold reclines in the arm chair.

Harold puts his sister in a car seat.

Leslie reclined on the Spongebob Squarepants chair.

Leslie put her purse on the Spongebob Squarepants chair.

Mark will recline in his hotel room.

Mark will put his briefcase in his hotel room.

Jimmy has reclined by the pool way too much this summer.

Jimmy’s friends have put firecrackers under his lounge chair. 

 

Lie/Lay -- More Examples
The Verb "Lay"
Jerry lays the newspaper carefully by the door.   or The carriers lay the newspaper. . . .
Yesterday Jerry laid the newspaper by the door.
Jerry has laid the newspaper by the door everyday for the past year.  He deserves a generous tip.
Jerry will lay the newspaper by the door.
Jerry is laying the newspaper by the door.

The Verb "Lie"
Right now,  Cindy lies on the beach.  or The girls lie on the beach.
Yesterday Cindy lay on the beach for two hours.
Cindy has lain on the beach for at least an hour everyday for the past two weeks.
Cindy will lie on the beach again tomorrow.
Cindy is lying on the beach.  I wonder if she reads books while she's lying there.  
 http://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=8203883204267677790#editor/target=post;postID=5734729962575725879
Confusing Words : Lie/Lay
Use these forms of the confusing verbs lie and lay correctly in the following sentences:
Lie, lay, lain, lying, lay, laid, laid, laying
You may use your yellow half-sheet with the rules.

1. “My Bonnie ____________(s) over the ocean.
My Bonnie _____________(s) over the sea, . . .”

2. “Now I ________ me down to sleep”

3. Jonas was __________ (use an “ing” word) on the grass,
as he felt the warm sunshine.

4. Father was _________ (use an “ing” word) the newchild into the basket.

5. Yesterday, the Giver _________ his hands on Jonas’ back.

6. I have ________ on the deck by the pool until I was badly sunburned.

7. The bricklayers have __________ five rows of bricks for our new gate.

8. I love to ___________looking up at the stars on a clear summer night.

9. It’s time to ___________ down our weapons and sign a peace agreement.

10. If you’re just going to ________ down on the job, you won’t get paid.  

Lie/lay:   Which is the correct form to use in each of these sentences?  
   " When he revived, he was (laying, lying) in the hot sun in the middle of a garden path. . . "
   "The head was (laying, lying) a little clear of the water jar. . . " 
Notes on Lie/Lay Confusions
Lay, laid, laid = to place -- Notice that this verb takes a direct object. That means it is acting on an object. In the following sentences the object is the book.

Present tense (happening right now): I __________ the book on my desk.
Past tense (happened in the past): Yesterday I __________ the book on my desk.
Past participle (has happened in the past and may still be happening):
I have _________ that book on my desk every day for a week.

Lie, lay, lain = to recline -- Notice that this verb does not take a direct object. It is not doing something to an object.
Present tense: I ___________ on the couch.
Past tense: Yesterday I __________ on the couch.
Past participle: I have ___________ on the couch every day for a week.
Write original, complete sentences, correctly using each of the following forms of lie or lay. Capitalize and punctuate each sentence.
1. lie (present tense, meaning "to recline.")
2. lay (past tense of lie)
3. lain (always goes with a helping verb)
4. lying

5. lay (present tense, meaning "to put or to place")
6. laid (past tense of lay)
7. laid (using a helping verb)
8. laying 
    

Grammar Girl: Don't You Dare Lay. . . .  (Podcast on Ms. Dorsey's iTunes)



 

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs -- Huh?


Some verbs take a direct object. (Transitive) They do something to something.
need       “I need money.”
hit          “I hit the ball.”
kick         “I kicked my brother.”
destroy  “The transformer destroyed the city.
kiss        “I kissed Ernestine.”
The verb “lay” takes a direct object. It is transitive.
      “I carefully laid the beef roast inside the bars of the lion’s cage.”
  [The forms of the verb are lay, laid, has been laying, has laid.]

Some verbs do not take a direct object. (Intransitive)  They just do.
looked     “I looked, but didn’t see anything.” 
slept        “I slept all night.”
The verb “lie” does not take a direct object. 
 [The forms of the verb are lie, lay, has been lying, has lain.]


Some verbs can be either transitive or intransitive: shook, felt, read.


 

Illustrations from  http://funny-cats.blogspot.com/2006/03/cat-kiss.html and http://www.myfreewallpapers.net/cartoons/pages/sleeping-snoopy.shtml
http://www.inspirationfalls.com/beginning-and-ending-shake-hands/shake-hands-concepts-3/