Sunday, March 31, 2019

Spring Break!


Hope you're having a great Spring Break! 

Did anyone go to Holi (Festival of Colors) in Spanish Fork?  It's a fun cultural experience!

Did anyone participate in Earth Hour -- turning off your lights for an hour on Saturday Night, March 30?  Our house lights were off, but we were out at a play -- An American in Paris at the Hale Center Theater in Sandy.



Have you been enjoying the lovely weather?  





Thursday, March 28, 2019

Thursday/Friday, March 28/29, 2019


Announcements and Reminders for Thursday/Friday, March 28/29, 2019:                     

Remember to read chapters 17-18 of The Giver and complete your green 2x2x2 graphic organizer before class. Students can access the text online at
https://archive.org/details/TheGiverFullBook (Links to an external site.)  or
https://archive.org/stream/TheGiverFullBook/The%20Giver%20%28Full%20Book%29_djvu.txt. You can also come in during Cavetime or before school and use the books in the classroom.

You should have already turned in your T-Chart and List of 25 Choices.  

If you are missing points on your Contrasting Definitions paper,
if you haven't handed it in, do it and hand it in.
if you missed some of the answers, bring your paper and see Ms. Dorsey or Mrs. Hilton to revise your answers either verbally or in writing.

If you need the materials to make up your Stations Activity, they are available on Canvas.    
Other materials are also on Canvas.   


Targets for Today:






Today’s  Agenda for Thursday/Friday, March 28/29, 2019:

Students read the poem Good Timber.docx
How does the message of the poem relate to The Giver?

2x2x2 Discussion
1. Person A shares


Ms. Hilton read chapter 19.
Students read chapter 20,  each volunteer reading about one page

Students Listed all the memories they could think of that Jonas received.
They Created a new list of "What Makes Life Meaningful"
They Compared that with the list they made as they first began reading The Giver

They Discussed the good things.
They Wrote about the "bad/hard" things.






If You Were Absent:




Vocabulary:



 Help and Enrichment 

Symbolism is an important part of many pieces of literature.  Using symbols, the author can say much more with the words used.  Here are some of the symbols used in The Giver.  Can you think of any others?

Symbols in The Giver

The Newchild
For Jonas, the newchild Gabriel is a symbol of hope and of starting over. Babies frequently figure as symbols of hope and regeneration in literature, and in The Giver this makes perfect sense: Gabriel is too young to have absorbed the customs and rules of the community, so he is still receptive to the powerful memories that Jonas transmits to him. 

The Sled
The sled, the first memory Jonas receives from the Giver, symbolizes the journey Jonas takes during his training and the discoveries he makes. It is red, a color that symbolizes the new, vital world of feelings and ideas that Jonas discovers. Before he transmits the memory, the Giver compares the difficulty he has in carrying the memories to the way a sled slows down as snow accumulates on its runners. The novelty and delight of the downhill ride are exhilarating, and Jonas enjoys the ride in the same way that he enjoys accumulating new memories. But the sled can be treacherous, too: the first memory of extreme pain that he experiences involves the sled. Pleasure and pain are inevitably related on the sled, just as they are in the memories.

The River
The river, which runs into the community and out of it to Elsewhere, symbolizes escape from the confines of the community. When little Caleb drowns in the river, it is one of the few events that the community cannot predict or control, and Jonas and the Giver are inspired to try to change the community by the idea of the river’s unpredictable behavior.

https://www.sparknotes.com/lit/giver/symbols/

The river forms a border of the community before continuing on to Elsewhere. As a border, the river comes to symbolize escape—crossing the river means leaving the community. Because it takes the life of the four-year-old Caleb, the river also symbolizes the danger inherent in that escape.  
https://www.litcharts.com/lit/the-giver/symbols/the-river


The Lighter Eyes 
The lighter eyes, which are extremely rare, symbolize separation/differentness from the community.  When Lily points out that both Jonas and Gabriel have the lighter eyes, that bothers Jonas because he wants to be a part of the community, not different. 
The light eyes symbolize a person's ability to think and see more clearly and deeply.  The book never gives a color for the lighter eyes, but most of us would assume that they are blue.  Blue symbolizes clarity.  

The Apple 
The apple symbolizes life.  The red color symbolizes strong emotions.  The apple can be an allusion to the Biblical story of Adam and Eve choosing mortal life with both joys and sorrows.  

The Hill 
The hill, for Jonas, represents a gateway to Elsewhere. Riding a red sled down the hill is his first memory and his first awareness of the color red. It signifies his realization that outside his community there is a world not dominated by Sameness. Later, Jonas dreams of the hill and feels the need "to reach the something that waited in the distance," something "good…welcoming… [and] significant." Yet, through memories of the hill, Jonas learns the precarious relationship between joy and pain; without one, the other cannot exist. Jonas's first experience with real pain is falling off the same sled that thrilled him only days earlier.  -- 
from https://www.litcharts.com/lit/the-giver/symbols/the-snow-covered-hill

The Birds
Birds, because they can fly, often symbolize freedom.   The birds at the end of the book can symbolize freedom for certain characters.

What about Gabriel's name in The Giver?   In the Bible, Gabriel is an angel who is the herald (announcer) of Good News.


And Jonas -- Jonah or Jonas in the Bible --

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Tuesday/Wednesday, March 26/27, 2019



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Announcements and Reminders:
         
Get caught up before Spring Break -- next week!
You should have already turned in your T-Chart and List of 25 Choices.  

If you are missing points on your Contrasting Definitions paper,
if you haven't handed it in, do it and hand it in.
if you missed some of the answers, bring your paper and see Ms. Dorsey or Mrs. Hilton to revise your answers either verbally or in writing.

If you need the materials to make up your Stations Activity, they are available on Canvas.     


Targets for Today:
I can use the evidence and questions I have prepared to contribute to small group discussions.
 I can prepare for discussion by finding 2 quotes and writing 2 pieces of commentary that explain how Jonas’ relationship with the Community has changed over the course of the novel.
 I can prepare for discussion by asking 2 questions about how the ways Jonas has changed affect the meaning of The Giver.


Today’s  Agenda:

Get out your "Save the Last Word" papers and pick up a copy of The Giver and your composition book. 
A2 finished and handed in their list of choices with the T-Chart.

Watch a clip from The Tales of Ba Sing Se.   Answer these questions:


1-      What happened to Uncle Iroh’s son? How do you know?

2-      What is the purpose of painful memories? Is it better to keep them or to let go of them? Explain why or why not. Support your answer with evidence from the clip.

Save the Last Word Discussion 
Giver--Save the Last Word organizer.docx

Fill out an index card, answering these questions about your  participation in the "Save the Last Word" discussion:
Were you prepared?   Rate yourself from 1-5 with 5 the best.
Did you stay on topic?  Rate yourself from 1-5 with 5 the best.
Did you use your notes?  Rate yourself from 1-5 with 5 the best.


View/Listen to "Just Another Day in Paradise."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QR4Y6Ll0DwA
 Answer these questions: 
1-       The family described in this song is very imperfect. Why does the singer consider this imperfect family a “paradise?”


2-      Would Jonas agree? Why or why not? Support your answer with a quote from The Giver.


Identify the conflict in The Giver

Homework: 
Read Chapter 17-18 and do  2x2x2 discussion prep. 
You can even search for words and phrases in this online copy of the novel. 



If students finish early, they can start the first page of the final assessment short answer questions. 



If You Were Absent:




Vocabulary:



 Help and Enrichment 



Thursday, March 21, 2019

Friday/Monday, March 22/25, 2019



Announcements and Reminders for Friday/Monday, March 22/25, 2019:
                         
You will turn in your T-Chart and List of 25 Choices after doing one more quick activity with it. Listen for directions for that.

If you are missing points on your Contrasting Definitions paper,
if you haven't handed it in, do it and hand it in.
if you missed some of the answers, bring your paper and see Ms. Dorsey or Mrs. Hilton to revise your answers either verbally or in writing.

If you need the materials to make up your Stations Activity, they are available on Canvas.  


Targets for Today:
I can show what I know about editing.
I can find information in a text to clarify ideas in the text.


Today’s  Agenda for Friday/Monday, March 22/25, 2019:

1. Get out your composition book and a copy of The Giver. 
Be prepared to turn in your T-Chart and List of 25 Choices when directed to.

2. Practice Test for our RISE Testing in May
Students complete a benchmark test for the RISE Testing. 
  • Wait to open the chromebook until you are told to do so. 
  • DO NOT SIGN IN.
  • Click on the nine-patch in the lower left corner.
  • Select the Questar link. 
  • Sign in using the information on your ticket. 
  • Take the Editing Test --  There are 2 questions -- each with about 5 parts. 8
3. When you finish, pick up a Giver book and read chapters 14-16.
You will receive an assignment to do with these chapters.  (Finding quotes from the book about three different topics.)

A quote from a book does not need to be a piece of dialogue. You can be quoting any text from the chapters you are reading.  

Scoring:  
4 points: appropriate behavior during and after testing, following instructions after (quietly reading from The Giver)
3 points:  appropriate behavior during testing, quiet after but not following directions. 
2 points: disruptive after.
1 point:  disruptive during
None of the above scores may be made up.
0 points: absent -- may make up points 

When finished, submit the test, then begin reading The Giver (chapters 14-16).   Follow the directions for collecting quotes about three different topics.

Read chapters 14-16.
Save the Last Word In-Class Assignment
Giver--Save the Last Word organizer.docx

B5, B6  -- if finished with chapters and collecting quotes, in your composition book. . . .
 Write a half-page or more to answer this question:
If you could erase your most painful memory would you?  Why or why not?



an interesting definition for sameness:  an edit to nature, making life easier and more manageable

for next time:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QR4Y6Ll0DwA&start_radio=1&list=RDQR4Y6Ll0DwA

A2  For another time:   Write a half-page or more to answer this question:
If you could erase your most painful memory would you?  Why or why not?
If You Were Absent:

Make arrangements with the teacher to take the benchmark test.  It will most likely take you about 15 minutes.
Hand in your T-Chart and 25 choices paper when you return. First ask Mrs. Hilton what she would like you to do with it first.  


Vocabulary:



 Help and Enrichment 

Here is some information about the cover art on The Giver -- especially the photograph of the old man.


The Giver on the cover was celebrated in his own right. 

In 1979, years before she wrote The Giver, Lowry was working as a journalist when she interviewed painter Carl Gustaf Nelson. The Swedish-born painter had lived in New York and taught painting in Boston before retiring to Maine’s Cranberry Island. Nelson’s art earned him spots in prestigious shows like the Whitney Biennial, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s collection contains two of his pieces. Lowry visited Nelson at his home off the coast of Maine, and while there she got the chance to photograph him. 

 Nelson may also have inspired the Giver. 

In her 1994 Newbery Award acceptance speech, Lowry reminisced about meeting Nelson: “I spend a good deal of time with this man, and we talk a lot about color. It is clear to me that although I am a highly visual person—a person who sees and appreciates form and composition and color—this man’s capacity for seeing color goes far beyond mine … Now and then I wish, in a whimsical way, that he could have somehow magically given me the capacity to see the way he did.” 

 Nelson had something in common with the Giver.

Nelson passed away in 1988, but his face stuck with Lowry. She loved the interesting picture of Nelson so much that she held on to it, and later turned it into cover art. The choice of Nelson as the cover model would turn out to have a deeper meaning for Lowry. The artist had spent the last few years of his life in blindness, which sparked a connection. As Lowry explained in a 2006 interviewwith Teachingbooks.net, “[His] life was filled with color … for him to lose color, as the Giver in the book begins to lose color, seemed such a wonderful analogy that I’ve always been glad his photograph is on the cover.”