Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Thursday, March 1, 2012

 Self-Starter: 
Students received a tape-in to place in the composition book under “Editing.” 
Title: What do you notice?
What do you notice about these sentences?  Write about three or more things you notice about them.  What you notice could be about individual sentences or about all of them.  At least two of your noticings should be about something we’ve been studying lately.

My papa’s hair is like a broom, all up in the air.  And me, my hair is lazy.  It never obeys barrettes or bands.  Carlos’s hair is thick and straight.  He doesn’t need to comb it.  Nenny’s hair is slippery – slides out of your hand.  And Kiki, who is youngest, has hair like fur.
 ---Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street (1991)

 
Reminder:  You already have this handout.  Look at it again to see what you know about the use of apostrophes in it.
1.  Harold's eyes were glued to the floor.  He couldn't look.
2.  Harold is in the principal's office.
  --Dav Pilkey, Captain Underpants and the Preposterous Plight of the Potty People (2006)
3.  Spelda tousled her son’s thick, black hair.
  -- Paul Stewart and Chris Riddle, The Edge Chronicles: Beyond the Deep Woods (1999)

4.  Mac’s office is located in the East Wing boys’ bathroom, fourth stall from the high window.
-- Chris Rylander, The Fourth Stall
_______________________________________________________________ 

Media Center -- Mrs. Jones Presents: Nonfiction  

Books Mrs. Jones Recommended

 ______________________________________

Counselors will come in to explain Registration for Eighth Grade 

______________________________________

Spelling test on -

Vocabulary/Spelling #13       Test on March 1
Prefix to study:   post- which means after

1.      postgraduate
2.      postpone  -- extra credit:  "pone" means "to place", so postpone means "to place after."
3.      postwar
4.      postscript  -- extra credit: "Script" comes from a word part meaning "to write,"   so, postscript means "to write after."
____________________________
Spelling for Next Time:   

Vocabulary/Spelling #14           Test on March 9
 Suffix to study:   -ly which means in the manner of (adverb)
1.      sincerely       extra credit: < L sincerus pure, clean, untainted
2.      usually
3.      finally
4.      carefully
5.      immediately  
___________________________________

If time, 

Make snowflakes and begin Ice Story. 


Help with Apostrophes

Final apostrophe test -- March 13

Nonfiction for the February/March Book-of-the-Month

 

Monday, February 27, 2012

I've been reading. . .

I just finished reading Sapphique by Catherine Fisher.  It's the second and final book following Incarceron.  They're a unique take on distopian fiction.  Incarceron is a prison that is alive and has the power to care for or torment its prisoners.  The outside world appears to be a medieval kingdom, but they have advanced technology and have chosen to not use it -- or so it appears. 

I also read Tuesdays at the Castle by Jessica Day George, the author of Dragon Slippers, and a local author.   When I bought it, I took it to my seven year old granddaughter, and she read it within a few days.   Then it was my turn.  It's an enjoyable story about an eleven year old princess, her older sister, and their fourteen year old brother who is the crown prince.  Rhat means he will be the next king.
 
They live in a very unique castle.  Here is the opening line:  "Whenever Castle Glower became bored, it would grow a new room or two."   The plot thickens (rising action) when their parents go missing and are apparently dead.  A wicked foreign prince and traitorous counselors from their own government plot to take over the country, underestimating the three royal children and the powers of the castle itself.

I just realized that Sapphique and Tuesdays at the Castle share a common idea -- a building that lives and thinks.  However that two books have very different moods and outcomes.

Sapphique is distopian fiction, and Tuesdays at the Castle is fantasy.

Sunday, February 26, 2012

Help with Apostrophes

Student notes on Possessives.doc

Overheads for Possessives(1).doc 



Other information about apostrophes:

Noticing Sentences and Apostrophes

Using Apostrophes to Show Possession

 A Game for Contractions: http://www.vocabulary.co.il/contractions/intermediate/where-does-the-apostrophe-go/ 

and another: http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/game/en29punc-game-beat-the-clock-apostrophes

Another game: Possessives or Not?  and Soccer:

http://www.firstschoolyears.com/literacy/word/punctuation/apostrophes/interactive/possapos.swf

You could also go to http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/interactive/literacy2.htm#apo   and look for the activities and instructions for apostrophes

 Here's what Grammar Girl has to say: http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/apostrophe-1.aspx

and

http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/apostrophe-plural-grammar-rules.aspx 

___________________________________________________________________

Cool video about apostrophe use:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fE0IBPtbY2o

___________________________________________________________________

Important samples:

a.  Do you have a month's supply of pencils?   Notice that the "supply" belongs to the "month" and that because it is just one month, you just add an "'s" to the word "month."

b.  Ms. Dorsey just assigned  us four months' worth of homework.  There's no way we can get it done before school gets out.    The amount of homework belongs to four months.  Because months is already plural with an "s" at the end, you just add an apostrophe to the end.

Contractions: 

c.  In '89 when the big Northern California earthquake struck, I was living in San Jose.  

______________________________________

More samples:  Notice how apostrophes are used.

This is Ben's book.   (The book belongs to Ben.)

Julie, Sue, and Patty were eating lunch.  Joey ran up and dumped the girls' plates onto the floor.  They weren't happy with him.

It's Presidents' Day today.  It's my dad's birthday as well. 

James's sister put his homework into their brother's backpack. 

James is only one of five brothers in Susan's family.  The boys complain that Susan is always hiding her brothers' belongings. 

We're not going to school today.  I'm going to the zoo instead.

My best friend is Hailey Jones.   She's a great friend.

Hailey Jones's dad owns the zoo. 

I'll be going to the zoo with the Jones family.

The Jones' car is a Hummer.   

The children's favorite place at the zoo is the gorillas' habitat. 

Hailey's brother Sammy was born in '99.

Hailey's and Sammy's rooms are on the third floor of their mansion.  

Their mom's and dad's first names are Florence and Jess.  

Florence and Jess's  bedroom suite takes up the whole  fourth floor of their mansion.  (or) Their mom and dad's bedroom is on the fourth floor.

Hailey's family is going to visit their uncle's home in France this summer.  

Their uncle's name is George Smith. 

Next summer they will visit their aunts' homes in Australia.  

It's a day's journey in a car from one aunt's home to the other's. 

It's three days' journey from there to Brisbane, where Florence grew up.

______________________________________

Monday, February 20, 2012

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Self-Starter:  More about apostrophes.



External Text Features
Time before last we looked at some external text features -- in windows and in the book -- photographs.
Last time, you used external text features, a photograph, other illustrations, and text boxes to prepare to read "Survive the Savage Sea."
Today you're going to learn more about why and how to use external text features,  They're handy, helpful things!

Ice Story -- Nonfiction





Start signing up for your nonfiction book.  A non-fiction book is true.  The subject of non-fiction is real.  A nonfiction book could be a biography, an autobiography, or it could be about some other true subject.  The story of the subject is not fictionalized.  However, we call some of the best nonfiction books "literary nonfiction."  Literary nonfiction is told as a story and is told in a very interesting way with high-quality writing.   Ice Story is "literary nonfiction."

For this project, select a book about a single subject.  Don't try to use an encyclopedia-type book that covers many different subjects. 

You could use one book that is over 100 pages, or shorter books on the same subject that total over 100 pages. 



Originally published February 19, 2012
A2 did not do the creating external text features exercise -- teen driving. 
A 3 and A4 went over  the test.
and A3 started reading Ice Story -- the Prologue

Saturday, February 18, 2012

Friday, February 24, 2012

Self-Starter: Pick up and work on packet to prepare for reading  passages from the book "Survive the Savage Sea."  (external text features and nonfiction)  You'll find this assignment in our green literature book.  You will listen to/read along with story and finish filling out the packet by the end of class.
__________________
In case you are absent, here is the packet.  
Survive the Savage Sea Reading Map Jan 2012.doc
You could get started filling it out, then complete the parts that require the literature textbook when you come back.
Find out more about the Robinson family at http://www.survivethesavagesea.com/SSS.htm
_____________________________________
2. Spelling Test on -less

3. Apostrophe Test  (You may use the pink sheet from last time as you take the test.)  If you didn't do well on the apostrophe test, see this links and the links on it:   Help with Apostrophes




4. Listen to and follow along with the nonfiction story "Survive the Savage Sea" taking notes in your packet.  If you were absent, make up the packet and reading during Cave Time.

Vocabulary/Spelling #12             Test on  Friday, February 24
 Suffix to study:   -less which means without (It creates adjectives.)
1.      hopeless
2.      useless
3.      careless
4.      fearless
5.      worthless 
 
___________________________
Our Next Spelling Test: 
Vocabulary/Spelling #13       Test on March 1
Prefix to study:   post- which means after

1.      postgraduate
2.      postpone  -- extra credit:  "pone" means "to place", so postpone means "to place after."
3.      postwar
4.      postscript  -- extra credit: "Script" comes from a word part meaning "to write,"   so, postscript means "to write after."


Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Self-Starter:  Micro-Fieldtrip --- Museum Walk for Ice Story.
Pictures for Museum Walk -- If you were absent.  You can also find the handout there.
After the museum walk, students found some of the same pictures in the nonfiction book Ice Story.  Photographs are one type of external text feature that is added to books and articles to help the reader understand.

2.  See your corrected January-February book assessment and essay. 
In your composition book,  create an individual list of conventions that are problems for you.


3.  Apostrophes--   Today we reviewed and students took notes and received guides for deciding whether to use an apostrophe.  We will have the apostrophe test on Friday.

Today.  Print the "Student Notes"  handout , and use the "Overheads" document to fill in the blanks:
Student notes on Possessives.doc

Overheads for Possessives(1).doc 

Other information about apostrophes:

Noticing Sentences and Apostrophes

Using Apostrophes to Show Possession

 A Game for Contractions: http://www.vocabulary.co.il/contractions/intermediate/where-does-the-apostrophe-go/ 

and another: http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/game/en29punc-game-beat-the-clock-apostrophes

Possessives or Not?  and Soccer:

http://www.firstschoolyears.com/literacy/word/punctuation/apostrophes/interactive/possapos.swf

Go to http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/interactive/literacy2.htm#apo   and look for the activities and instructions for apostrophes

 

Important samples:

a.  Do you have a month's supply of pencils?   Notice that the "supply" belongs to the "month" and that because it is just one month, you just add an "'s" to the word "month."

b.  Ms. Dorsey just assigned  us four months' worth of homework.  There's no way we can get it done before school gets out.    The amount of homework belongs to four months.  Because months is already plural with an "s" at the end, you just add an apostrophe to the end.

Contractions: 

c.  In '89 when the big Northern California earthquake struck, I was living in San Jose.  

______________________________________

Vocabulary/Spelling #12             Test on  Friday, February 24
 Suffix to study:   -less which means without (It creates adjectives.)
1.      hopeless
2.      useless
3.      careless
4.      fearless
5.      worthless
  
(Teams, snow)

Friday, February 17, 2012

Nonfiction for the February/March Book-of-the-Month

Nonfiction for the March/April Book-of-the-Month

Have your book to bring to class before or by ___________.  You may begin reading it before then. 
You will create at least one type of external text feature for your book. Your project will be due by ___________, with no late work after _________.

Rubrics for Projects: External Text Features for your Book-of-the-Month
You need only do one. _______________ or sooner. 

Books Mrs. Jones Recommended

See this article in the School Library Journal about some award winning nonfiction books.

Your nonfiction book will be an informational book about a single subject ( not a how-to or self-help book)  and not a collection such as Guinness Book of World Records or Ripley's Believe It Or Not).

As usual, the book you choose needs to be a book at  or near your reading level -- usually 100 below to 50 above lexile.


Find a topic you really would be interested in learning more about, and look for a book about that topic.

See FAQ's at the above tab for Book-of-the-Month. 


Qualities of some types of nonfiction:
Report of Information
It focuses on a specific subject, or controlling idea.
It supports the controlling idea with plenty of facts.
It organizes facts in a way that helps the audience learn about the subject.
It uses examples, explanations, and descriptions to clarify ideas that may be new to the audience.

Autobiography
The main character is the writer of the book.
It recounts key incidents in the writer's life.
It describes major influences (people, events, places) on the writer.
It describes interactions between the writer and significant people in his or her life.
It reveals the writer's feelings, reactions, values, and goals.

Biography
It tells about a real person.
It shows that the writer knows a lot about this person.
It describes the person's environment.
It provides anecdotes or details that show the person in action.
It shows how the person affects other people.
It states or implies how the writer feels about the person.

___________________________________

Some Possible Titles:
Chew on This by Charles Wilson and Eric Schlosser (YA version of Fast Food Nation)
Knots in My Yo-Yo String -- autobiography of Jerry Spinelli  (great fun!)
Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Hoose, Phillip M.  133 pages.With Their Eyes: September 11th--The View from a High School at Ground Zero  by Annie Thomas (editor)  
Black Potatoes: The Story of the Great Irish  Famine, 1845-1850 by Susan Campbell Baroletti 
 An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 (Newbery Honor Book) by Jim Murphy  S
Shutting Out the Sky: Life in the Tenements of New York, 1880 - 1824 by Deborah Hopkinson Lincoln: A Photobiography by Russell Freedman 
The Boys' War: Confederate and Union Soldiers Talk About the Civil War by Jim Murphy 
Now Is Your Time!  The African-American Struggle for Freedom by Walter Dean Myers 
Guinea Pig Scientists by Dendy and Boring  
Survive the Savage Sea by Robertson  
Left for Dead (the story of the U.S.S. Indianapolis)   
Homesick by Jean Fritz  
Brian's Song  by Blinn  (a screenplay about Gale Sayers and Brian Piccolo)  
Marshfield Dreams: When I Was a Kid by Ralph Fletcher   Try it out at Google Books.

See more information and recommendations at http://cavemanenglish.pbworks.com/Nonfiction.

(earlier published February 4, 2010 -- Revised and republished February 16, 2010, February 17, 2012)

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Excerpts from Historical Fiction Essays

Beginning of introduction from KayDee D. [Notice the indent at the beginning of the paragraph.]

      I have read historical fiction novels about the Civil War many times, and I have always had several questions come to my mind.  . . .

Beginning of first body paragraph and an informal citation from KayDee D. [Notice that she uses a transition word to begin the paragraph]

      First, let's focus on the question of whether Captain Wirtz was real.  According to the "Confederate General and Captain Timeline" on Wikipedia, as well as the "What's Real" chapter in the back of the book, the answer to this is yes, he is a real person. . . .

Notes on Essay for Historical Fiction

Open up Microsoft Word and type your essay there.  
I recommend saving it to your student folder.



1. You need an introduction that tells what your book is and who the author is, then makes a statement (the overall main idea for the essay) about the facts behind the fiction. 


2.  You need three or more body paragraphs that discuss what you learned about the real history (real facts) behind the made-up story in your book.  
      You need at least three informal citations in which you tell right in the sentence where you got that information. 

Informal Citation 2012


3.  You need a concluding paragraph that sums up the essay.  Make a statement (concluding sentence) that tells about how real history facts fit with the made-up story (fiction) of the book.

4.  Check through the rubric to make sure you've earned as many points as possible.  If not, revise and edit to earn more points.

5.  a. Print two copies of your essay.

     b. Staple one to the front of the grading rubric. 

     c. Hand both in to the top wire basket.


When you've finished and handed in your essay, see me about visiting the media center to look for nonfiction books. 


Excerpts from Historical Fiction Essays

Wednesday, February 15, 2012 This is the day we had time in the computer lab to type these essays.

 

 

Monday, February 13, 2012

The Suffix -less

worthless
fearless
useless





          
careless
A hopeless case -- a joke -- in fact, a pun!
hopeless

Friday, February 17, 2012

Self-Starter:  Prepare for the book share by making sure you know what year or years your book took place in.

Book Share --   (If you were absent, pick up a chart to fill in.  Look up ten historical fiction books and their time periods.  Fill in the chart for those ten books and create a time line with those books)

Create a time line with your book and the books others students shared with you.
You time line will include dates, book titles, and the subject or era of the book.

Example:


    about                              1840                    1910                   1914-1918                 1990's
100 A.D.
_____/___________________/_____________/______________/_________________/______
The Bronze Bow                 Lyddie                Words                   All Quiet on                     The
Jews vs. Romans            Textile Factory     By Heart           the Western Front          Breadwinner
                                         workers              Segregation           World War I                War and
                                                                                                  German Soldier             Taliban
                                                                                                                                     in Afghanistan

 ________________________________

Come prepared  to share what you learned about the real history behind your historical fiction book. On Wednesday you will print two copies of your essay -- one for grading and one to share in class  today.

2. Spelling test on "mis-" words.   

3. New spelling words: Periods 1 and 2 need to pick up this list.

Vocabulary/Spelling #12             Test on  Friday, February 24
 Suffix to study:   -less which means without (It creates adjectives.)
1.      hopeless
2.      useless
3.      careless
4.      fearless
5.      worthless

 

Parent Teacher Conference Thursday, the 16th

Originally published 2/9/12

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

1. Finish video of Words By Heart.

Reminder: Test next time  (Friday, January 17)  spelling test on "mis-" words.  
Come prepared on Friday to share what you learned about the real history behind your historical fiction book.

Type or finish typing the essay about the facts behind the fiction for your historical fiction book.
Research and Essay for Historical Fiction:    -- Due February 15. 
We will be in Lab 201 on Wednesday to FINISH the essays.  You should have your research done and be near to finishing when you come on Wednesday.  Bring your essay on a flash drive or have it saved on your student drive.

Print 2 copies of your essay -- one for grading and one to share in class on Friday.

Book of the Month Essay for Historical Fiction.docx

Historical Fiction Essay Research.docx 
If you use SIRS Discoverer,  cite the article you found on it, not just SIRS Discoverer.

Rubric for Historical Fiction Essay.docx

The essay will be graded based on your writing a complete essay, presenting your research on the background of your novel, using informal citation, and using seventh-grade-appropriate conventions.  


Sample for Historical Fiction Essay 

For Riley C:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horses_in_World_War_I 

http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/horses_in_world_war_one.htm

____________________________________________


The Help

 

Garrett and others who read The Light in the Forest

_________________________________

 Watch Video of Words By Heart  All classes finished watching it.

A1 From where  Lena has found her father at Hawk's Hill, and he's telling her about what happened.

A2 From where Claudie is telling about the "white hats"

A3 From  "before Mr. Starnes come, do you want to say goodbye?"

A4 From  where Lena had just taken Tater home.

Monday, February 13, 2012

Minimal Day: See chart below on this post.

Self-Starter:  Learn about using Informal Citation.

About research and essay -- Essay due by the end of class next time -- February 15.
informal citation -- Use three or more informal citations in your essay.  These will refer to the sources you used when you did research on the subject of your historical novel.

Research and Essay for Historical Fiction:    -- Due February 15. 
We will be in Lab 201 on Wednesday to FINISH the essays.  You should have your research done and be near to finishing when you come on Wednesday.  Bring your essay on a flash drive or have it saved on your student drive.


Book of the Month Essay for Historical Fiction.docx

Historical Fiction Essay Research.docx

Rubric for Historical Fiction Essay.docx

The essay will be graded based on your writing a complete essay, presenting your research on the background of your novel, using informal citation, and using seventh-grade-appropriate conventions.  

Sample for Historical Fiction Essay 

_________________________________

 Watch Video of Words By Heart

A1 got to Lena has found her father at Hawk's Hill, and he's telling her about what happened.

A2 got to  Claudie telling about the "white hats"

A3 got to before "before Mr. Starnes come, do you want to say goodbye?"

A4 got to where Lena had just taken Tater home.


Your spelling test on "mis-" will be on Friday, February 17.
Vocabulary/Spelling #11             Test on February 17, 2012
misprint
Prefix to study:   mis- which means incorrect, bad 
  1. mistake
  2. misprint
  3. misplace
  4. misinform
  5. misuse
__________________________________

If you have not finished your book assessment from the 9th, finish it up during Cave Time on Tuesday or Thursday. 


This post originally published 2-9-12
Minimal Day
Time Period Minutes
8:15 – 9:15 1st Period 60 minutes
9:20 – 10:20 2nd Period/Announcements 60 minutes
10:20 – 10:45 First Lunch 25 minutes
10:50 – 11:50 3rd Period 60 minutes
10:25 – 11:25 3rd Period 60 minutes
11:25 – 11:50 Second Lunch 25 minutes
11:55 – 12:55 4th Period 60 minutes

Saturday, February 11, 2012

Subject-Verb Agreement Rules for Seventh Graders

-->
Rules for Subject-Verb Agreement
·      Nouns joined with  “and” take a plural verb.
·      Singular nouns joined with “or”  or “nor” take a singular verb.
·      When a singular  and a plural noun are joined by “or,”  the one closest to the verb tells you whether the verb is singular or plural. 

·      “Don’t” is plural and “Doesn’t” is singular.

·      If a subject is followed by a prepositional phrase, cross out the prepositional phrase before you decide what the verb should be.  Example:  One of the students (a. is / b. are) absent.
o   Prepositions include  at, by, for, from, in, of , on, to, with and others.

·      Sometimes groups of words beginning with  the words “who. . . ,” “as well as. . .  ,”  or “including. . . . ,” or others come between the subject and the verb.  Cross them out before you decide what the verb should be.
o   Examples:   My aunt, who loves to eat raw tomatoes, (a. grow / b. grows) a huge garden.
§  My aunts and uncles, including  Aunt Hermione, (a. live / b. lives) in Utah.
§  My Aunt Hermione, as well as Uncles Ron and Harry, ((a. live / b. lives)  in Orem. 

·      Some words that end in “s” are singular, such as mathematics, civics, dollars, measles, and news. 

·      Some words that end in “s” are plural, such as scissors, tweezers, shears, and trousers.

·      The words each, each one, either, neither, everyone, everybody, anybody, anyone, nobody, somebody, someone, and no one are singular and require a singular verb.

·      Stop that pen!  Don’t cross out the prepositional phrase if it goes with these words:
o   All, any, half, most, none, and some are plural unless they are followed by a  prepositional phrase with a singular noun. 
§  Most have already been eaten.
§  Most of the pies have already been eaten.
§  Most of the pie has already been eaten.

·      When a sentence begins with “here” or  “there,”  turn the sentence around in your mind so the subject  comes first.   Example:  There (a. was /b. were)  bats living in the ceiling.   Change it to “Bats were living in the ceiling.”




Have you contracted this disease?

Quote of the Day: "Literature is a textually transmitted disease, normally contracted in childhood."
-Jane Yolen

The author of The Devil's Arithmetic was born on this day in 1939.

Friday, February 10, 2012

Correct Antarctic Subject-Verb Agreement


Bell-Ringer:  Subject/Verb Agreement  -- Find ten subject-verb agreement errors in the following passage about Antarctica.  Underline the subject, circle the incorrect verb, and write the correction above the circled verb.


             is 
 There are a place on earth where few 
                    is
creatures can survive.  The land are covered 
                                                     are
with ice and snow, and temperatures is far below freezing for most of the year.   Beyond the warm lands of South America,
                                                         lie
Africa, Australia, and New Zealand lies the cold waters of the Antarctic Ocean.  If all the ice and snow that covers 
                 were (subjunctive)
Antarctica was to melt, the world's seas would rise about 250 feet.                                     inhabit                                      are
     The only creatures that inhabits Antarctica's interior is 
                                                                     live
insects.  However, thousands of penguins lives on the continent's frozen coasts.  Skuas, which you might remember
                                            are
from the movie Happy Feet, is probably the penguins' worst 
                                                    live
enemy.  Whales and seals also lives in the waters 
surrounding  the continent. Most of the people who live in 
                are
Antarctica is scientists.

Symbolism

Authors and presenters of Valentines use flowers as symbols -- a way to represent feelings.   A symbol stands for something unlike itself.  Here are some examples of the symbolism of flowers:

red roses = beauty and love
yellow roses = friendship
pink roses =appreciation
white roses = purity
daisies = innocence
lilies = humility and sweetness
lilacs = new love
tulips = trust
sunflowers = loyalty
hydragenas = understanding and compassion
peonies = bashfulness
carnations = fascination
irises = faith and wisdom
orchids = rare and delicate beauty
hyacinths = playfulness

from http://dictionary.reference.com/

Totally, Like Whatever, You Know?



http://www.wimp.com/speaktypography