Monday, April 30, 2012

Question-Answer Relationships

QAR's - Question-Answer Relationships


Whether you are answering questions or creating your own questions as you read, it is helpful to know where to look for the answers to various types of questions. When you are reading, there are four main types of question-answer relationships. Here they are, with a brief explanation for each:
  1. Right There. The answer is in the text, and if we pointed at it, we'd say it's "right there!" Often, the answer will be in a single sentence or place in the text, and the words used to create the question are often also in that same place.
  2. Think and Search. The answer is in the text, but you might have to look in several different sentences to find it. It is broken up or scattered or requires a grasp of multiple ideas across paragraphs or pages.
  3. Author and You. The answer is not in the text, but you still need information that the author has given you, combined with what you already know, in order to respond to this type of question.
  4. On My Own. The answer is not in the text, and in fact you don't even have to have t read the text to be able to answer it. 

 


Examples from "The Three Little Pigs" of the four types of question/answer relationships: 
Where do you look for the answers?

Right ThereHow many little pigs are there?   Three.  The answer is right there.

Think and SearchWhat did the three pigs use to build their houses?  You have to read more than one sentence -- maybe even more than one page -- to find the complete answer.

Author and You Which little pig are you more like -- the one who used straw or the one who used bricks?   You'd have to know the story to answer this, but you also have to know yourself.  


On My Own.   What do you know about wolves?  You don't need to have read or even heard of the story of "The Three Little Pigs and the Big Bad Wolf"  to answer this question. 

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Extra Credit

Find the error:



This was shared on Facebook.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
or --
Brian P. Cleary    The word CAR predates the automobile by hundreds of years. The Middle English CARRE, from French, and before that, the Latin CARRUS (wheeled vehicle) once referred to a carriage, cart, chariot, wagon, truck, or other conveyance. By the late 1800s, CAR began to refer to autos.
Read the above, then tell me what you found out about the history of the word "car." 

Reporting the New as Poetry

http://www.npr.org/2012/04/27/151517039/newspoet-monica-youn-writes-the-day-in-verse?sc=fb&cc=fp

Friday, April 27, 2012

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Friday, April 27, 2012

Self-Starter:  On page 3 of the Stand Tall Packet, complete Self-Starter #I, read pages 1-3 and answer #II.
Hand in Literary Letter #1.

2. Create a study guide for reviewing prefixes and suffixes.
Magical Study Guide small.docx

Link to the chart of our Seventh Grade Prefixes and Suffixes

3. Sparkle for our spelling words.

4. Read Stand Tall

 Reminder:
Use the study guide we are making today to study your spelling (Prefixes, Suffixes, their meanings, and the associated words)  for our test on 
May 3.  You can also use the yellow chart, and all sets of words are posted on this blog under the tab above  for "Spelling." 


Originally published, April 23, 2012.

A1  --  Answered parts I and II as directed.  They did not read more.
A2  --   Answered parts I and II as directed.   Read through the end of chapter 1, and had some time to answer questions.
A3 --   Answered parts I and II as directed.   Read through the end of chapter 1, and had some time to answer questions.
A4  --   Answered parts I and II as directed.  Read through the end of chapter 1, and had some time to answer questions.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Originally published, April 23, 2012.
You will vote for 8th grade officers (for next year)  during the first few minutes of Cave Time today.  
_____________________
1. Self- Starter: Write about your contemporary realistic fiction book.  Literary Letter #1 -- See below.

2. Prefix and Suffix Review -- Practice Test    Pretest on Prefix- Suffix.doc

3. Begin reading Stand Tall by Joan Bauer  -- Anticipation Guide, Begin chapters
Here is the first part of the packets for Stand Tall:   Stand Tall Packet Part 1.doc

A1 did only I - III of the anticipation guide.  The rest of the classes did I-III on pages 1 and 2.
A2  did I-III on the anticipation guide and spent a little time on Self-Starter on page 3, and read the first three pages.
A3  did I-III on the anticipation guide and did an introduction to QAR's using the inside of the dust jacket for Stand Tall.
A4  did I-III on the anticipation guide and did an introduction to QAR's using the inside of the dust jacket for Stand Tall, and read pages 1-3. 

And here is the second part of the packets for Stand Tall: Stand Tall Packets Part 2.doc
We will hand out hard copies of that later in class.  
______________________________________
More about the Self- Starter: Write about your contemporary realistic fiction book.   For suggestions for contemporary realistic fiction, see the tab above for Book of the Month, or look under "Life and Its Problems" at   Recommended Books  or  go to  Contemporary Realistic Fiction
If you're not enjoying your book, change to another.


Literary Letter #1: 
Write a letter to Ms. Dorsey, to answer these questions:

What book are you reading and who is the author?
Who is the main character (or one of the main characters)? 
What conflict is the main character (or one of the main characters) in your contemporary realistic fiction book facing?
Conflicts:  
man vs. man     man vs. self     man vs. society     man vs. nature     man vs. the supernatural  


How is this main character and his or her life like and unlike your life?  
Conclude. 



Your letter will look something like this: 
Write it in letter format with heading, greeting, body, and conclusion. 
Don't forget --if you are handwriting it -- to underline the book title.  Italicize book titles if you are typing.


American Fork Junior High School
Room 206 
Period A2
April 23, 2012


Dear Ms. Dorsey,  [Tell about the book and the main character, and his or her main conflict.  This example is NOT realistic fiction.]
      I’m reading Speed of Light by Lee Baker.  The main character in my book is Pierce Black.  His biggest conflict is man vs. man because there are people trying to kill him who have already killed his wife and brother in law and others.  
[Tell how you're NOT like the main character.]
      He is not like me because he is an adult and I’m pretty sure no one wants to kill me.   He has been married and has a son, and of course I don’t.   [And more. . . ]
[Tell how you're  like the main character.]
      We do have some things in common because he’s a test pilot, and that is what I’d like to be.  He also enjoys reading Shakespeare plays like I do.  [And more. . . ]
       In conclusion, the main character in Speed of Light and I are alike in some ways, and unlike in others.  I certainly hope I never have the types of problems he has!

Sincerely,
Jim White




Grading for Literary Letter #1  from ____________ Period ____
o   ________ In letter format including heading, greeting, body with paragraphs, closing, and signature.
o   ________What book are you reading and who is the author?
o   ________Who is the main character (or one of the main characters)? 
o   ________What conflict is the main character (or one of the main characters) in your             contemporary realistic fiction book facing?  
o   ________How is this main character and his or her life like and unlike you and your life? 
o   ________Handed in by April 27.
________  /30 Total 

Don't forget to italicize the title of your book, or underline it if you are handwriting this letter. 

If needed:  Spelling Make-Up

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Extra Credit -- Quote


We read to know we are not alone. -- C.S. Lewis


3 points extra credit for memorization

Monday, April 23, 2012

Irony vs. Coincidence

Thanks to Brian Cleary for this explanation:                    
IRONY or COINCIDENCE? Irony has to do with an incongruity between an event and an expectation. Coincidence has to do with an event (or fact) and a different event (or fact). Examples: IRONY: A man takes a step aside in order to avoid getting sprinkled by a wet dog, falls into a swimming pool. Event vs. expectation. COINCIDENCE: You get into a car accident on May 1, and the last time you got in an accident, it was May 1. Event compared to event.
By the way, 
  1. Verbal irony is a trope in which the intended meaning of a statement differs from the meaning that the words appear to express.    For example, the sick person said he felt "just great."

  2. Situational irony involves an incongruity between what is expected or intended and what actually occurs.  [This is what we're talking about above.]

  3. Dramatic irony is an effect produced by a narrative in which the audience knows more about present or future circumstances than a character in the story.   [http://grammar.about.com/od/il/g/ironyterm.htm]

Definition of Irony  --  http://www.wordcentral.com/cgi-bin/student?book=Student&va=irony
Irony. The difference between what someone would reasonably expect to happen and what actually does happen.
Situational Irony . When one’s efforts produces the opposite results of what was expected
  • Example from “The Ransom of Red Chief.”  A boy is kidnapped, but instead of the kidnappers demanding money for the kid’s return, the parents demand money to take him back.
  • Historical Example: Surrendering guards at the Bastille still managed to kill 98 citizens.
Verbal Irony. A contrast between what is said and what is actually meant
  • Literary Example: Prometheus says to Zeus, “You are as kind as you are wise.” Zeus thinks it’s a compliment. Because Prometheus doesn’t think Zeus is wise, it’s actually an insult.
Dramatic Irony. When the audience knows things the characters do not
  • Romeo and Juliet Example: We know Juliet has taken a sleeping potion. Everyone else, except Friar Lawrence, thinks she is dead.
  • Literature Example: In Horton Hears a Who, we know that Horton really is talking to little people on a bubble, but everyone else thinks he’s crazy.
  • http://www.elacommoncorelessonplans.com/literature-reading-standards/exemplars-g-9-10/short-story-guides-lessons/teaching-irony.html

Example: Stanley Yelnats was excited to get to go to Camp Greenlake and found out it was not a camp and there was no lake. 


More Examples: 


Ironic or Unfortunate? 
Lyrics   "Ironic" by Alanis Morissette 
               and Official Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jne9t8sHpUc
An old man turned ninety-eight
He won the lottery and died the next day
It's a black fly in your Chardonnay
It's a death row pardon two minutes too late
Isn't it ironic, don't you think?
It's like rain on your wedding day
It's a free ride when you've already paid
It's the good advice that you just didn't take
And who would've thought, it figures
Mr. Play It Safe was afraid to fly
He packed his suitcase and kissed his kids good-bye
He waited his whole damn life to take that flight
And as the plane crashed down he thought
"Well, isn't this nice"
And isn't it ironic, don't you think?
It's like rain on your wedding day
It's a free ride when you've already paid
It's the good advice that you just didn't take
And who would've thought, it figures
Well life has a funny way of sneaking up on you
When you think everything's okay and everything's going right
And life has a funny way of helping you out when
You think everything's gone wrong and everything blows up in your face
A traffic jam when you're already late
A no-smoking sign on your cigarette break
It's like ten thousand spoons when all you need is a knife
It's meeting the man of my dreams
And then meeting his beautiful wife
And isn't it ironic, don't you think?
A little too ironic, and, yeah, I really do think
It's like rain on your wedding day
It's a free ride when you've already paid
It's the good advice that you just didn't take
And who would've thought, It figures
Well life has a funny way of sneaking up on you
And life has a funny, funny way of helping you out
Helping you out

Irish comedian Ed Byrne:"Like a traffic jam when you're already late."

That's not ironic, it's just a pain . .  , that's what that is. When was the last time you were late for something, got stuck in a traffic jam and said "Look at the irony on this, there's irony for ya! I'll tell ya I was in a fierce ironic traffic jam the other day I'll tell ya. The irony was ninety!"

No, there's nothing ironic about being stuck in a traffic jam when you're late for something. Unless you're a town planner. If you were a town planner and you were on your way to a seminar of town planners at which you were giving a talk on how you solved the problem of traffic congestion in your area, but couldn't get to it because you were stuck in a traffic jam, that'd be well ironic. "I'm sorry I'm late - you'll never guess..."

"It's like rain on your wedding day." Only if you're marrying a weatherman and he set the date.

I could go on and I will.

A no-smoking sign on your cigarette break, that's inconsiderate office management. A no-smoking sign in a cigarette factory - irony. It's not a difficult concept, Alanis. It's very rare you see an ironic no-smoking sign, although if you ever see one of those that say "thank-you for not smoking" and you are, that's fairly ironic.

The best line in that song has got to be the line "It's like 10,000 spoons when all you need is a knife." 

That's not ironic, that's just . . .  stupid. How big is your sink, Alanis? We haven't got 10,000 spoons beween us, have we? 

What do you need this knife for? To stab the bloke who keeps leaving spoons all over your house. 

But we'll give her the benefit of the doubt. Imagine you needed a knife for something, couldn't find one because all you find was 10,000 spoons. Could happen. And therefore you couldn't do whatever it was you needed the knife for - then the next day it turned out that a spoon would have done.

Avoid the Summer Slide!

Avoid the Summer Slide!

No, not this type of slide.

Plan and prepare now to avoid the summer slide in skills you've been practicing in school.

Make sure you have books to read -- especially books that challenge you just enough to be enjoyable and to stretch your reading muscles -- -- and set aside time to read during the summer.



Originally published 2011-05-31

Friday, April 20, 2012

Monday, April 23, 2012


Core Testing  = CRT Testing = Utah State Test

Remember to bring a book to read in case you finish early.

You may bring a clear water bottle and keep it under your chair while testing on the computer.
Don't let yourself be dehydrated. 

You may not bring snacks.  Make sure you have eaten a healthy breakfast, and, if you're in A4, a healthy lunch, too.

Get enough sleep the night before.

Hints for taking tests:

http://www.studygs.net/tsttak1.htm 


Spring 2012  Core Test: What Will Be On It This Year -- Probably

_____________________________________
 A2:   Write a letter to Ms. Dorsey, to answer these questions:

What book are you reading and who is the author?
Who is the main character (or one of the main characters)? 
What conflict is the main character (or one of the main characters) in your contemporary realistic fiction book facing?  How is this main character and his or her life like and unlike your life?  
Conclude. 


Your letter will look something like this: 
Write it in letter format with heading, greeting, body, and conclusion. 
Don't forget --if you are handwriting it -- to underline the book title.  Italicize book titles if you are typing.

American Fork Junior High School
Room 206 
Period A2
April 23, 2012


Dear Ms. Dorsey,  [Tell about the book and the main character, and his or her main conflict.  This example is NOT realistic fiction.]
      I’m reading Speed of Light by Lee Baker.  The main character in my book is Pierce Black.  His biggest conflict is man vs. man because there are people trying to kill him who have already killed his wife and brother in law and others.  
[Tell how you're NOT like the main character.]
      He is not like me because he is an adult and I’m pretty sure no one wants to kill me.   He has been married and has a son, and of course I don’t.   [And more. . . ]
[Tell how you're  like the main character.]
      We do have some things in common because he’s a test pilot, and that is what I’d like to be.  He also enjoys reading Shakespeare plays like I do.  [And more. . . ]
       In conclusion, the main character in Speed of Light and I are alike in some ways, and unlike in others.  I certainly hope I never have the types of problems he has!

Sincerely,
Jim White



Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Thursday, April 19, 2012


Core Testing  = CRT Testing = Utah State Test

Remember to bring a book to read in case you finish early.

You may bring a clear water bottle and keep it under your chair while testing on the computer.
Don't let yourself be dehydrated. 

You may not bring snacks.  Make sure you have eaten a healthy breakfast, and, if you're in A4, a healthy lunch, too.

Get enough sleep the night before.

Hints for taking tests:

http://www.studygs.net/tsttak1.htm 


Spring 2012  Core Test: What Will Be On It This Year -- Probably

The Successful Test Taker


A successful test taker attempts to answer every question.



A successful test taker always reads the directions carefully.
A successful test taker reads through the questions before reading the passage they go with.
 

A successful test taker reads all answers on a multiple choice question before marking the answer.

A successful test taker rereads  parts of a passage when looking 
for the answers to questions about it.
This successful test taker uses skimming and scanning or closely reading as needed.

A successful test taker does not rush through the test.
A successful test taker concentrates on his or her own work and doesn’t worry about how others are doing.
A successful test taker always gets a good night’s sleep 
the night before the test.
A successful test taker eats a well-balanced breakfast 
on the morning of the test.

A successful test taker will reread the passage if necessary.

 A successful test taker does not get overly stressed about the test.
 
A successful test taker does his or her best on the test. 

Monday, April 16, 2012

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

All about Recognizing  Main Ideas 
and About Preparing for Testing

Self-Starter for A4:
  1. Write your name on the green paper.
  2. Read the passage on the green paper. 
  3. Below the passage label and write a one word topic for the passage.  What is it about?
  4.  Expand the topic to four or five words that tell more exactly what the passage is about. This should NOT be a complete sentence.
  5. Look for one sentence in the passage that tells what the whole thing is about.  Underline that sentence. 
(Save the Raisin) 
______________________________

Self-Starter for A1, A2, A3:
1. Under Notes and Quick Writes,write for about ten minutes about one aspect of your spring break.

2. Create a title which is the topic -- one   word
3. Write the main idea of your ten minute write in one sentence.

(Save the Raisin)
________________________________
Today we are going to focus on figuring out the topics and main ideas of passages.

Target:  Each student should be able to recognize the topic and main idea of a passage, using clues within and around the passage. 

 

 

4.  Music for Main Idea  on YouTube(Building a Paragraph)
or
Main Idea Song  on TeacherTube

5. Clues for Finding the Topic and Main Idea


 6a. Topic practice with objects and ideas   -- toy, utensil,

6b. How Big is Your Topic?  

A Narrow or a Broad Topic?

A4: Raisins

A4: Test Prep

Test practice

Wild Animals 

Test Preparation:  Silent Conversation on the Whiteboard front and back (class divided) with four markers

The Successful Test Taker



Main Idea Practice:  to- Raisins    (test practice with poem)    with -   Siv Cambodian  [Where is Cambodia?]  (test practice with editing)   by  -- Beavers or Zoo  (test practice with a passage)

A1, A2, A3 did Chips, Raisins,  and started Siv with notes
    A3 needs test prep silent conversation  
A4 did  Chips, Raisins,  and Beavers

Reminders:
Have you signed up for your realistic fiction book?  Today is the due day for signing up.



Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Clues for Finding the Topic and Central Idea


Central Idea will be a complete sentence.

  • It will include
    •     the topic and  
    •     the idea the author wants you to learn about the topic.



  • It will NOT be a question.  It will be a complete statement.
  • It will be broad enough to cover the big idea(s) in the chapter.
  • It will be narrow enough so it's NOT including things that are not in the chapter.
  • It will NOT include your own opinions about the chapter.



Notes on Finding a Topic
[The topic is what it's about -- the subject.]
Use these clues when looking for the topic of a passage :
Look for 
  • illustrations, captions
  • titles, headings, subheadings
  • repeated words 
  • synonyms 
  • pronouns that repeat nouns  (for example,  Bob, he, Bob's, his, Bob, him)
  • Ask yourself, "What is the author of this wanting me to learn about?"

Notes on Finding or Creating a Central Idea
  • Central  Idea = topic + the idea the author is stating about the topic
  • Central  Idea and Topic Sentence are synonyms.
  • We usually talk about the "Central Idea" when we are talking about nonfiction.
  • The "central idea" in fiction is called the theme.
  • The Central Idea must be a complete sentence.
  • The Central Idea will NOT be a question.  It must be a statement.
  • Ask yourself, "What is the general idea of this passage?"   
  • Ask yourself, "What does the author want to tell me about this subject?" 


Most Common Places in a paragraph or passage to Find the Central Idea:
  1.  Beginning/First Sentence
  2.  End/ Last Sentence
  3.  Middle
  4.  It's not there!  This is called Implied or Unstated  (Those two words are synonyms.)
___________________________________

How Big is Your Topic?




Narrower Topics
Broader Topics
Broader Topics Still
baseball cap
hats
things people wear
table fork
utensils or silverware
things we use when we eat
rose
flowers
plants
the student to your right in English class
seventh graders
junior high students
Doritos
snack chips and dips
snacks



Which of the above topics fits the following paragraph?

            As soon as many students come through the door from school, they hurry to the kitchen looking for a snack.  A favorite after-school snack is chips with some sort of dip.  Some students prefer corn chips such as Doritos with salsa.   Others would rather have potato chips with a dip.  Students looking for a healthier alternative might go with pita chips served with hummus, or simpler yet, dried banana chips.  Recently you can also find other vegetable chips, including sweet potato chips.   Whichever sort of chips they are, these snacks help students satisfy their appetite enough to wait for dinner.   The students might even get some homework done while they wait for their evening meal, such as writing this paragraph about _____?_____.  

Which of the following would be the main idea?
a. Chips and dip.
b. A favorite after-school snack is one of several types of chips with some sort of dip.
c. These snacks help students satisfy their appetite enough to wait for dinner.
d. I love several sorts of chip with dips.  

Monday, April 9, 2012

STATE CORE TESTING

Here is a reminder of the days we will test: April 19 and 23.  Come well rested, hydrated, and having eaten a healthy breakfast (and lunch for 4th period).  This year you will take your test in the computer lab.






Sunday, April 8, 2012

Extra Credit: Opening a Book

From Goodreads
Quote of the Day: "It is very risky. But each time a child opens a book, he pushes open the gate that separates him from Elsewhere."
-Lois Lowry
Memorize for three points extra credit.

Saturday, April 7, 2012

A Narrow or a Broad Topic?

A Broad or Wide Canyon

A Very Narrow Canyon

A Very Narrow Canyon

Thursday, April 5, 2012

Friday, April 6, 2012

1.  Self-Starter for “Three Skeleton Key” by George C. Toudouze  
Use the green literature book.

 a.  Look at the title and illustration on page 65.
 b.  Silently read page 64.
c.  Do the quickwrite on page 64.   Write it in your composition book.



2.  Spelling test:  
Vocabulary/Spelling #18           Test on April 6, 2012        This is our last set!
Prepare for a test on all prefixes and suffixes.
 Suffix to study:   -tion  which means act or  state
1.       attention     extra credit:  The "at" part means "towards", and the "ten" part means  "to stretch or extend."  So if you are paying attention, you are stretching toward something.  Tension and tense come from the same word part as the "ten" part of attention. 
2.       population -- extra credit: "pop" means "people."
3.       operation --  extra credit:  "oper" means "work."
4.       transportation -- extra credit:  "trans" means "across."  "port" means "carry."


3.  Receive the chart for Prefixes and Suffixes.  Keep it to review and study for the overall test on them.  You will need to be able to match the prefixes and suffixes with their meanings, and spell the words we have already studied. 


4. Complete parts 2 and 3 of the reading guide.
5.  Read the questions for part 4 of the reading guide and listen to/follow along with the story before you answer them.
6. Answer the rest of the questions on the reading guide.


Three Skeleton Key Reading Guide.doc


If you could use a reminder of how plot works:
See a plot line created for Three Skeleton Key:   Three Skeleton Key Plot


You can read the story here:  http://www.scaryforkids.com/three-skeleton-key-free-horror-story/
Listen to a radio play at http://www.escape-suspense.com/files/three_skeleton_key.mp3






 originally published March 31, 2012

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

A.R.M.S. Revision Strategy

Need to revise?
Add  words, phrases or more information to help make your points clear and easy for the reader to understand. Add transition words, phrases or sentences to tie your thoughts and paragraphs together.

Remove words that repeat themselves and information that does not relate to the main idea of your paragraph or to the topic of the composition.

Move around words, phrases, sentences or even whole paragraphs in order to keep your ideas clear and flowing toward a logical conclusion.

Substitute words with more exact words or phrases that express what you want to say more clearly.


ARMS Revision with Examples



And Fingers for Writing with Sensory Images

Use your five fingers to help you remember to check whether you have used sensory images in your writing.

Count them off on your thumb and fingers:
1.  Does your description let your reader SEE what is happening?
2.  Does your description let your reader HEAR the voices and other sounds important to the story?
3.  Does your description let your reader FEEL what is happening -- either in tactile (touch) ways and/or in emotional ways?
4.  If it fits your story, does your description let your reader SMELL the smells that might be part of your story?
5.   If it fits your story, does your description let your reader TASTE  the tastes that might be part of your story?
source

source
source



Extra Credit: Memorize Poetry

Up to 12 points for memorizing any one of these poems:

Loveliest of Trees
by A.E. Housman

Loveliest of trees, the cherry now
Is hung with bloom along the bough,
And stands about the woodland ride
Wearing white for Eastertide.

Now of my threescore years and ten,
Twenty will not come again,
And take from seventy springs a score,
It only leaves me fifty more.

And since to look at things in bloom
Fifty springs are little room,
About the woodlands I will go
To see the cherry hung with snow.


Spring Pools by Robert Frost
These pools that, though in forests, still reflect
The total sky almost without defect,
And like the flowers beside them, chill and shiver,
Will like the flowers beside them soon be gone,
And yet not out by any brook or river,
But up by roots to bring dark foliage on.
The trees that have it in their pent-up buds
To darken nature and be summer woods --
Let them think twice before they use their powers
To blot out and drink up and sweep away
These flowery waters and these watery flowers
From snow that melted only yesterday. 
Very Early Spring by Katherine Mansfield
The fields are snowbound no longer;
There are little blue lakes and flags of tenderest green.
The snow has been caught up into the sky--
So many white clouds--and the blue of the sky is cold.
Now the sun walks in the forest,
He touches the bows and stems with his golden fingers;
They shiver, and wake from slumber.
Over the barren branches he shakes his yellow curls.
Yet is the forest full of the sound of tears....
A wind dances over the fields.
Shrill and clear the sound of her waking laughter,
Yet the little blue lakes tremble
And the flags of tenderest green bend and quiver. 
__________________________________________

[in Just-]

By E. E. Cummings
 
in Just-
spring          when the world is mud-
luscious the little
lame balloonman

whistles          far          and wee

and eddieandbill come
running from marbles and
piracies and it's
spring

when the world is puddle-wonderful

the queer
old balloonman whistles
far          and             wee
and bettyandisbel come dancing

from hop-scotch and jump-rope and

it's
spring
and

         the

                  goat-footed

balloonMan          whistles
far
and
wee
 

APRIL - POEM BY SARA TEASDALE


The roofs are shining from the rain. 
The sparrows tritter as they fly, 
And with a windy April grace 
The little clouds go by.

Yet the back-yards are bare and brown 
With only one unchanging tree-- 
I could not be so sure of Spring 
Save that it sings in me.