Sunday, June 2, 2019

Ms. Dorsey's Summer Reading


"Teachers are solar powered. They recharge during the summer." – Unknown

These are the books I'm reading this summer. 

1.  Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus  by Dusti Bowling   -- Genre:  Realistic Fiction/Life Problems
What would it be like to be born without arms?
What would it be like to be without arms and move to a new town and school in junior high? 

2.  How to Steal a Dog  by Barbara O'Conner   --  Genre:  Realistic Fiction/Life Problems
This story combines homelessness,  a very cute dog (who is not homeless) a spunky girl,  and figuring out how to steal a dog.  

3. The Hate U Give (Realistic Contemporary Fiction)  by Angie Thomas --  Warning:  a lot of language and some violence and sex.  It includes both positive and negative family relationships and role models.  If you're interested in reading this, I'd advise talking with a parent about it, and waiting until you're in high school.

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.
Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.
But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

4. Loki's Wolves by K.L. Armstrong and Melissa Marr.  Because I teach the mythology class, I've been looking for more novels that are based on mythology. The main characters are descendants of the Norse Gods who must stop Ragnarok (while other descendants try to bring it on).  I hope to read the other two books in the series -- Odin's Ravens and Thor's Serpents.

5. The Silver Penny by Randall Wright
Twelve-year-old Jacob (whose nickname is Deb) lives on a farm in the early 1800s in Pennsylvania and has a bad case of wanderlust. No hex can keep him from yearning for far-off places, and neither can a broken leg. But it can keep him from moving around at all. Deb is so miserable that he even misses doing chores. Nothing cheers him up -- not his cousin Tam and especially not that strange boy Bray who's been hanging about.

The only glimmer of brightness in Deb's life comes from Grandpa's lucky silver penny, which keeps mysteriously showing up. Soon its strange powers lead him on a journey that might be just the cure he needs.  -- summary adapted from Amazon. 
This is a strange book -- a mix of historical fiction and magical realism -- but I enjoyed reading it.  Mr. Wright is a local author.

6. Red Queen -- (Dystopian Fiction) - by  Victoria Aveyard - There are suggestions that this is a world that developed after some great destruction of what could have been our world.   People have evolved into two types -- those with red blood who have become the servant/slave class, and those with silver blood who have special powers and rule absolutely and with cruelty.  Mare has red blood, but she and the silver royals discover that she too has a special, dangerous power.   The royals attempt to use her for their own purposes, and she soon learns that "anyone can betray anyone."   This is a four book series.  I very much enjoyed the first book.

7.  The Night Diary (Historical Fiction) -- by Veera Hiranandani  -- Nisha and her twin brother are twelve years old and live with their Hindu physician father, their grandmother, and their Muslim cook and gardener  Kazi in the part of India that in 1947 became Pakistan.  Their mother (who died when they were born) was Muslim, so there had been some disapproval when their father and mother had married, but in general Hindus, Muslims, and Sihks all got along fine in their community until Great Britain gave India its freedom and the leaders decided there should be one country for Muslims and another for Hindus.  For her twelfth birthday, Kazi has given Nisha a diary, and Nisha decides she will use it to write every night to her dead mother.  The diary becomes the record of her family's flight from what was their home and is now dangerous and often deadly for Hindus.  If you liked reading Refugee, you will probably also find this book very interesting.

Enrique's Journey (adapted for young people) (Nonfiction)  by Sonia Nazario
This nonfiction book tells the story of a sixteen-year-old boy who attempts (several times) to travel from his home country of Honduras to the United States to find his mother.   She had left him and his sister in the care of family members when he was five.  Her husband had left the family and she was desperate to support her children -- providing them with food, clothing,  and perhaps even education.


Reading:
Educated: A Memoir (Autobiography)  by Tara Westover  -- Tara grew up in Southern Idaho with survivalist parents.  She was not sent to either elementary or secondary school but eventually taught herself enough to be accepted to a university at age seventeen, then goes on to Cambridge and Harvard.


For parents:
The Lost Girls of Paris  (Historical Fiction)  by Pam Jenoff  -- I enjoyed reading it, but it fell short of what it could have been.  This is one of those books where it feels like the author tried to wrap up the ending too quickly.
“Fraught with danger, filled with mystery, and meticulously researched, The Lost Girls of Paris is a fascinating tale of the hidden women who helped to win the war.” —Lisa Wingate, New York Times bestselling author of Before We Were Yours -- comment found on Amazon.
https://www.npr.org/2019/02/02/690916774/the-lost-girls-of-paris-fictionalizes-true-tale-of-female-spies-during-world-war

Becoming  (Autobiography) by Michelle Obama
This is Michelle Obama's autobiography.  Regardless of the reader's political views, it is both interesting and inspirational.

Abandoned books: (both of these are books for adults)
Lincoln in the Bardo -- too strange and too crass for my taste
I, Eliza Hamilton --  Good, but I had other books I'd rather read at the time. 




Other books you might be interested in: 
I haven't read all of these books, but other teachers are recommending them.   You could check CommonSenseMedia for more information on at least some of them.
  http://www.ethicalela.com/summer-reading-in-the-middle-remember-these/?fbclid=IwAR1ag8pQyZ6aNSpHmCvJ8XI8yIO70KYRMtHadXBtnEvJ1puTZeTr910U34Y



Suggestions for Summer Reading --
From Book 1: Nicholas Flamel appeared in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter—but did you know he really lived? And his secrets aren't safe! Discover the truth in book one of the New York Timesbestselling series the Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel. 
 
The truth: Nicholas Flamel's tomb is empty. 
 
The legend: Nicholas Flamel lives.

   Nicholas Flamel is the greatest Alchemyst to ever live. The records show that he died in 1418, but what if he's actually been making the elixir of life for centuries?
    The secrets to eternal life are hidden within the book he protects—the Book of Abraham the Mage. It's the most powerful book that has ever existed, and in the wrong hands, it will destroy the world. And that's exactly what Dr. John Dee plans to do when he steals it. 
    There is one hope. If the prophecy is true, Sophie and Josh Newman have the power to save everyone. Now they just have to learn to use it.  

“The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel has everything you loved about Harry Potter, including magic, mystery, and a constant battle of good versus evil.”—Bustle
Series:
If you haven't read
 the Harry Potter series,
 or Percy Jackson,
or Magnus Chase,
or the Legend Series,
or Hunger Games,
or Divergent,
or Uglies,
Maze Runner,
Matched (a community a lot like that of The Giver, but with very interesting differences),
the other books related to The Giver:  Gathering Blue, Messenger, Son,
or Arc of a Scythe,
I Am Number Four,
Among the Hidden,
Diary of  a Wimpy Kid,
Unwind,
Everlost Trilogy,
Sammy Keyes series,  (girl detective extraordinaire -- and very funny), 
this could be the time.

Individual Books (some have other related books):
Or how about
Little Women,
or any of Alan Gratz's books (he wrote Refugee),
The Crossover by Kwame Alexander,
Wonder, 
The Secret Life of Bees, 
Stargirl, 
Flipped, 
Fever 1793, 
Out of My Mind, 
Al Capone Does My Shirts, 
The Fourth Stall, 
The Hobbit (and The Lord of the Rings series), 
Savvy (three books), 
Walk Two Moons, 
Stand Tall, 
Maniac Magee, 
When You Reach Me.



Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Wednesday, May 29, 2019 -- A-Day


Announcements and Reminders for Wednesday, May 29, 2019:

You may still hand in your figurative language poster today. 
If you have a failing grade for this or last term, please hand in your work today!  

                        
Have a brilliant summer!   
Take the time to read!  
Our A.F. Public Library is sponsoring a reading program that begins June 1.      https://afcity.org/216/Summer-Reading-Program

   



Targets for Today:

I can compare and contrast two different versions of the same story.  


Today’s  Agenda for Wednesday, May 29, 2019:

Compare and contrast the text with the video.
Watch the rest of The Giver.
Watch part of The Outsiders.



If You Were Absent:
Don't worry!  Just have a great summer!
If you have a failing grade, please get your work to me A.S.A.P.


Vocabulary:



 Help and Enrichment 

Suggestions for Summer Reading --
From Book 1: Nicholas Flamel appeared in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter—but did you know he really lived? And his secrets aren't safe! Discover the truth in book one of the New York Timesbestselling series the Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel. 
 
The truth: Nicholas Flamel's tomb is empty. 
 
The legend: Nicholas Flamel lives.

   Nicholas Flamel is the greatest Alchemyst to ever live. The records show that he died in 1418, but what if he's actually been making the elixir of life for centuries?
    The secrets to eternal life are hidden within the book he protects—the Book of Abraham the Mage. It's the most powerful book that has ever existed, and in the wrong hands, it will destroy the world. And that's exactly what Dr. John Dee plans to do when he steals it. 
    There is one hope. If the prophecy is true, Sophie and Josh Newman have the power to save everyone. Now they just have to learn to use it.  

“The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel has everything you loved about Harry Potter, including magic, mystery, and a constant battle of good versus evil.”—Bustle
Series:
If you haven't read
 the Harry Potter series,
 or Percy Jackson,
or Magnus Chase,
or the Legend Series,
or Hunger Games,
or Divergent,
or Uglies,
Maze Runner,
Matched (a community a lot like that of The Giver, but with very interesting differences),
the other books related to The Giver:  Gathering Blue, Messenger, Son,
or Arc of a Scythe,
I Am Number Four,
Among the Hidden,
Diary of  a Wimpy Kid,
Unwind,
Everlost Trilogy,
Sammy Keyes series,  (girl detective extraordinaire -- and very funny), 
this could be the time.

Individual Books (some have other related books):
Or how about
Little Women,
or any of Alan Gratz's books (he wrote Refugee),
The Crossover by Kwame Alexander,
Wonder, 
The Secret Life of Bees, 
Stargirl, 
Flipped, 
Fever 1793, 
Out of My Mind, 
Al Capone Does My Shirts, 
The Fourth Stall, 
The Hobbit (and The Lord of the Rings series), 
Savvy (three books), 
Walk Two Moons, 
Stand Tall, 
Maniac Magee, 
When You Reach Me.








Monday, May 27, 2019

Tuesday, May 28 -- Yearbook Day


Bell Schedule 
B5 8:15-9:50 
      Receive and sign for Yearbooks
      Attend 2nd Assembly
B6 9:55-10:25 
B7 10:30-11:00 
B8 11:05-11:35 
Lunch 11:40-12:25 J Dawgs outside on back field 
A1 12:30-1:00 
A2 1:05-1:35 
A3 1:40-2:10 
A4 2:15-2:45

Hand in your Figurative Language Poster if you haven't.
You may take your posters if they have been handed in and graded.
Take your composition book, manila folder, and any of your graded work you'd like to keep. 

Friday, May 24, 2019

Friday, May 24, 2019 -- A-Day


Announcements and Reminders for Friday, May 24, 2019:
         
Today is your last day of English 7 class.    

  • Hand in your unused hall passes. 
  • The 22nd  was the last day to hand in late or revised work or and extra credit.  If you have a failing grade, you may still hand in work A.S.A.P.   
  • If you want your composition book, please take it.                         

The rest of the year -- 
A Day 14th  Practice word parts with Kahoot/  Book Groups  -- assign posters
A Day 16th    Book Groups -- Learn about figurative language   
A Day  20th    BRING YOUR PHOTO!!  We will make the posters today.   book groups
A Day  22nd  Test on Word Parts --  read your group books  -- RI
A Day  24th    Take the RI or read, finish Figurative Langage Posters, 
             Watch The Outsiders or The Giver  
A Day -- 29th   Watch The Outsiders or The Giver.  Bring treats if you wish!  


May 28th- YEARBOOK DAY
Bell Schedule
B5 8:15-9:50
B6 9:55-10:25
B7 10:30-11:00
B8 11:05-11:35
Lunch 11:40-12:25
A1 12:30-1:00
A2 1:05-1:35
A3 1:40-2:10
A4 2:15-2:45

                



Targets for Today:

I can show what I know about comprehending what I read.
I can compare and contrast the book of The Giver with the movie. 


Today’s  Agenda for Friday, May 24, 2019:

1. Finish and turn in your figurative language posters today if you haven't yet!

2. Retake the Reading Inventory in Lab 224.  
          Sit at your assigned computer. 
          Take this seriously.  You will receive points based on your results.  


3. Start watching The Giver movie, or watch part of The Outsiders.


If You Were Absent:

See above.  


Vocabulary:



 Help and Enrichment 




Thursday, May 23, 2019

Thursday, May 23, 2019 -- B-Day


Announcements and Reminders for Thursday, May 23, 2019:
  
Today is your last day of English 7 class.    


  • Hand in your unused hall passes. 
  • Yesterday was the last day to hand in late or revised work or and extra credit.  If you have a failing grade, you may still hand in work A.S.A.P.   
  • If you want your composition book, please take it.                         

Cavetime today will be locker clean-out. 

The rest of the year for B Day -- 
B Day 15th    book groups, practice word parts,  figurative language assignment --
B Day  17th    book groups,  learn about figurative language
B Day  21st     BRING YOUR PHOTO!  Make Posters --  Watch The Outsiders 
B Day   23rd   Word Parts Test -- if time, The Outsiders or The Giver video --   Bring treats if you wish.
May 28 is Yearbook Day  
May 28th- YEARBOOK DAY
Bell Schedule d
B5 8:15-9:50
B6 9:55-10:25
B7 10:30-11:00
B8 11:05-11:35
Lunch 11:40-12:25
A1 12:30-1:00
A2 1:05-1:35
A3 1:40-2:10
A4 2:15-2:45



Targets for Today:
I can show what I know about these types of figurative language: metaphor, simile, allusion, alliteration, onomatopoeia, hyperbole, personification.
I can show that I can recognize our seventh grade set of Greek and Latin word roots.
I can read independently.
I can show what I know about comprehending when I read.  


Today’s  Agenda for Thursday, May 23, 2019:

1. Finish posters, if needed, and/or study for the Word Parts Test.  
    Don't forget to label each type of figurative language on your poster. 

2.  Take the Word Parts Test.    
  •          Put all study materials out of sight. 
  •          Be prepared with a pencil. 
  •          Do not mark on the test.   
  •          On the bubble sheet, the only marks you make should be to fill in the correct bubble for each answer. 
  •          When you are finished, hand in the bubble sheet to the container on Ms. Dorsey's desk.

3.  Quietly get out your group book and read on your own. -- 
              No talking until the teacher says everyone 
                  is finished with the test.  

4.  Retake the Reading Inventory in Lab 224.  
          Sit at your assigned computer. 
          Take this seriously.  You will receive points based on your results.  




If You Were Absent:

See above.  



Vocabulary:



 Help and Enrichment 




Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Wednesday, May 22, 2019 -- A-Day



Announcements and Reminders for Wednesday, May 22, 2019:

All late work, revised work, and extra credit are TODAY, 
               Wednesday,  May 22.                         

BRING A PHOTO -- If you didn't finish up your poster last time, be prepared to do so within ten minutes this time. 
You will need to bring a photo of yourself doing something -- by May 20/21.  We are going to use them to make small posters.  You will write about that experience using figurative language. 

The rest of the year -- 
A Day 14th  Practice word parts with Kahoot/  Book Groups  -- assign posters
A Day 16th    Book Groups -- Learn about figurative language   
A Day  20th    BRING YOUR PHOTO!!  We will make the posters today.   book groups
A Day  22nd  Test on Word Parts --  read your group books  -- RI
A Day  24th   Watch The Outsiders -- about 60 minutes
A Day -- 29th   Watch The Outsiders -- about  60 minutes  Bring treats if you wish!  

May 28th- YEARBOOK DAY
Bell Schedule d
B5 8:15-9:50
B6 9:55-10:25
B7 10:30-11:00
B8 11:05-11:35
Lunch 11:40-12:25
A1 12:30-1:00
A2 1:05-1:35
A3 1:40-2:10
A4 2:15-2:45
                       
                        



Targets for Today:

I can show what I know about these types of figurative language: metaphor, simile, allusion, alliteration, onomatopoeia, hyperbole, personification.
I can show that I can recognize our seventh grade set of Greek and Latin word roots. 
I can read independently.
I can show what I know about comprehending when I read.  


Today’s  Agenda for Wednesday, May 22, 2019:

1. Finish posters, if needed, and/or study for the Word Parts Test. 

2.  Take the Word Parts Test. 
         Put all study materials out of sight. 
         Be prepared with a pencil. 
         Do not mark on the test.   
         On the bubble sheet, the only marks you make should be 
                   to fill in the correct bubble for each answer. 
         When you are finished, hand in the bubble sheet 
                   to the container on Ms. Dorsey's desk.

3.  Quietly get out your group book and read on your own. -- 
              No talking until the teacher says everyone 
                  is finished with the test.  

4.  Retake the Reading Inventory in Lab 224.  
          Sit at your assigned computer. 
          Take this seriously.  You will receive points based on your results.  





If You Were Absent:
See above. 


Vocabulary:



 Help and Enrichment 



Sunday, May 19, 2019

Tuesday, May 21, 2019 -- B-Day


Announcements and Reminders for Tuesday, May 21, 2019:
All late work, revised work, and extra credit are due by May 22 - Wednesday.
No cave time on Wednesday. 

Study your word parts!  
                         
BRING A PHOTO
You will need to bring a photo of yourself doing something -- by May 20/21.  We are going to use them to make small posters.  You will write about that experience using figurative language. 

The rest of the year for B Day -- 
B Day 15th    book groups, practice word parts,  figurative language assignment --
B Day  17th    book groups,  learn about figurative language

B Day  21st     BRING YOUR PHOTO!  Make Posters --  Watch The Outsiders, if time.
B Day   23rd   Word Parts Test -- Reading Inventory -- The Outsiders --   Bring treats if you wish.
May 28 is Yearbook Day  

May 28th- YEARBOOK DAY
Bell Schedule d
B5 8:15-9:50
B6 9:55-10:25
B7 10:30-11:00
B8 11:05-11:35
Lunch 11:40-12:25
A1 12:30-1:00
A2 1:05-1:35
A3 1:40-2:10
A4 2:15-2:45

Targets for Today:

I can recognize and use several types of figurative language:  allusion, alliteration, 


Today’s  Agenda for Tuesday, May 21, 2019:

1. Drill each other on your word parts for the test next time.

2. Review figurative language.
Review

______________________ in Batman
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmjIPRqPChs

_________________ in  Toy Story
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_53YsFkFZ4

Teacher:  https://allearssite.wordpress.com/2016/06/10/allusion-teach-it/

3. Create your Figuratively Speaking Poster

Write out your figurative language first BEFORE you add it to your poster. 
Label each type of figurative language. 
It's a good idea to do it on a separate piece of paper from your photo, then tape them together.  
Write first in pencil.  Then go over it in ink. 
Your work must be neat and legible. 

By May _20/21– for English class
Bring a photo of yourself DOING SOMETHING.
Your poster must be neat and legible. 
In class you will create a poster about that photo including
-1 simile
-1 metaphor
-1 hyperbole
-1 personification
-1 onomatopoeia   
-1 allusion   

Label each type of figurative language.

Extra credit for alliteration (at least three or more repetitions of a sound)



Sample picture and Figurative Language 
from the famous Ms. Dorsey

Though the night was as dark as pitch,  (simile/comparison)
seeing the play Nosferatu live on stage was a dream come true. (metaphor)
We were dying to meet the actor who played the title role. (hyperbole)
You can tell that the camera loved us as we danced with the vampire after the show. (personification)
Thud, thud, stomp, stomp went our feet.  (onomatopoeia) 
This was a vampire who neither sparkled nor made girls swoon, 
but spending time with him was a thriller.  (allusions) 
Very soon the villainous, vigorous, voracious vampire 
vanished from view.   (alliteration)




Samples of Types of Figurative Language and a Sound Device
Simile:
Poised between going on and back, pulled
Both ways taut like a tight-rope walker,
Now bouncing tiptoe like a dropped ball,
Or a kid skipping rope, come on, come on!…
Taunts them, hovers like an ecstatic bird,
He’s only flirting, crowd him, crowd him,
(The Base Stealer by Robert Francis)

Metaphor:


  • The assignment was a breeze. (This implies that the assignment was not difficult.)
  • Her voice is music to his ears. (This implies that her voice makes him feel happy)
Personification: 
  • The wind whispered through dry grass.
  • The flowers danced in the gentle breeze.
  • Time and tide waits for none.
  • The fire swallowed the entire forest.
Onomatopoeia:
  • The buzzing bee flew away.
  • The sack fell into the river with a splash.
  • The books fell on the table with a loud thump.
  • He looked at the roaring sky.
  • The rustling leaves kept me awake.
Hyperbole:
  • My grandmother is as old as the hills.
  • Your suitcase weighs a ton!
  • She is as heavy as an elephant!
  • I am dying of shame.
  • I am trying to solve a million issues these days.
Allusion:
  • “Don’t act like a Romeo in front of her.” – “Romeo” is a reference to Shakespeare’s Romeo, a passionate lover of Juliet, in “Romeo and Juliet”.
  • The rise in poverty will unlock the Pandora’s box of crimes. – This is an allusion to one of Greek Mythology’s origin myth, “Pandora’s box”.
  • “This place is like a Garden of Eden.” – This is a biblical allusion to the “garden of God” in the Book of Genesis.
Alliteration:
From Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”
“The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew,
The furrow followed free;
We were the first that ever burst
Into that silent sea.”


If You Were Absent:




Vocabulary:



 Help and Enrichment 

Your word parts:
audi
hear
dict
speak
ject
throw
port
carry
rupt
break
scrib/script
write
spect
see, look
struct
build
tract
pull
vis, vid
see

auto
self
bio
life
graph
write
hydro
water
meter
measure
ology
study of
photo
light
scope
examine
tele
far
therm
heat