Required Reading/Book Assessments

An Overall - All-Genres  List of Recommended Book for Seventh Graders
to download and print if you wish
These are mostly or all fictional: 
or go to these wiki pages:

http://cavemanenglish.pbworks.com/w/page/8952526/Recommended%20Books

And here's a list of books recommended for 9 and 10 year olds. There are many on the list that you shouldn't miss!    http://www.readbrightly.com/50-best-books-9-10-year-olds/
I just found this list:(Feb. 2017)  http://www.deliciousreads.com/2015/09/40-clean-reads-for-teens.html   And here is a recommended resource for book ratings:  http://www.compassbookratings.com/   or try http://www.pluggedin.com/

              Here is the list of  Books Not Allowed for the Outside Reading Assignment.


Please notice below which genre is required for each month. 


_____________________________________________
November /December 
Your choice.
We will write Letters About Literature to enter into the contest sponsored by the Library of Congress.

Letters About Literature
Here are the videos to watch: http://www.read.gov/letters/videos.html
Read winning letters:   http://www.read.gov/letters/contests/winners/2018/index.html
All of the lessons:  http://www.read.gov/documents/LAL-Teaching-Guide-REVISED.pdf
      You can scroll down to the handouts.
Instructions for Letters about Literature (1).docx

Permission Slip for students under 13 as of 11/1/18


_____________________________________

September:  Your choice of fictional genre in a novel
October:  Contemporary Realistic Fiction
November: Fantasy or Science Fiction, including Dystopian Fiction -- cancelled
December:  Your choice.   If you have a very favorite book, you could read it again.
You will write a letter to the author of the book you read about how the book has affected you -- as part of the Letters About Literature contest.
____________________________________


October Book of the Month
Select a book from this genre: 

Realistic Fiction in a Modern Setting

This includes some suggested titles.


                    Here is the list of  Books Not Allowed for the Outside Reading Assignment.
Sign up by October 15/16.
Your project is due by November 2/5. Project:  Theme
You will identify a major theme for the book, 
and support that identification with evidence from the book. 
(November will be Fantasy/Science Fiction, including Dystopian Fiction.)

This is the handout for collecting evidence of themes.
Book of the Month Theme Chart.doc


                                    Themes in My Book of the Month
My book title _______________________________________  
Author _______________________________ 
# of pages _________



Definitions:
·      A theme is a big idea about life revealed in a piece of literature.
·      A theme is an idea or message about life, society, or human nature.
·      Novels will usually express several themes.
·      A theme in literature is stated as a complete sentence.
·      It will not be a question.
·      The theme of a book will be expressed in at least several different places in the book.

A theme will not necessarily be directly stated.  More often it is implied from the story – from what happens and how 


As you finish reading, you will select a major theme from the book to write about.  You will write an argument using the evidence to prove it is a theme in this book.  You will hand these in with your argument.


Most seventh grade students should be reading in the 6-8 band or above. 

Grade
Band
"Stretch"
Lexile Band*
 K–1
N/A
 2–3
420L–820L
 4–5
740L–1010L
 6–8
925L–1185L
9-10
1050L–1335L
11–CCR
1185L–1385L


Material for Make-Up Work:  https://my.hrw.com/la_2010/na_lit/student/ebook_gr7/osp/data/u1_riki_tiki_tavi_se.pdf _____________________________________________



Book of the Month Assignment
English 7 – Ms. Dorsey’s Classes

The Assignment:  This year, besides the books we read in class, you will read a book each month.    You will have some time to read in class, but you will also need to read at home (and in the car, and while you’re waiting at the doctor’s office, and so on).   Most months I will assign a particular genre for you to read.   You will select from that genre a book that has 100 pages or more, have Ms. Dorsey approve it,  read it, and complete a different assignment each month based on the book you read.   
        For this first month, you will be able to select a book from any fictional genre that is written in novel form.  Genres include fantasy, science fiction,  contemporary realistic fiction (including sports, romance, many adventure books, books about problems in life, and others), historical fiction, mystery, Western (usually historical),  and humor. 

novel is a long narrative, normally in prose, which describes fictional characters and events, usually in the form of a sequential story.  – Google Search for “novel, definition, literature”

September Book Project: 
Students will be graded on the completion of the book and their ability to discuss their novel in depth. 
Students need to be prepared to discuss several topics:
*summary of the book read  -- leaving out spoilers
*ranking it on a scale of 1-10 and  explaining why
* particular elements or aspects of literature that we are learning about in class
Where to find books:  school media center, classroom library, your home library, A.F. Library – or others, bookstores and used-book dealers, other stores. garage sales.





See the tab above for Required Reading to find links to lists of recommended books. 

1. September/October  Book Assignment
Date Due
Genre
Element or Aspect of Literature

September 26/27
We will hold the book discussions on these days.
Finish reading your book BEFORE your assigned day. 

Be able to summarize it and evaluate it.
Any Fictional
Genre
(a novel)
Character  and Conflict
      Who is the protagonist?
       Who is the antagonist?
What is the major conflict?
       Which type of conflict is it?
How does the protagonist change over the course of the book?   (Avoid Spoilers)
Does the antagonist change?
Types of conflict:
person vs. self
person vs. person
person vs. society
person vs. technology
person vs. nature
person vs. the unknown/supernatural











____________________________________________________
Plan ahead for Summer Reads


These recommendations for  advanced 5th and 6th graders are also great for 7th graders!
http://www.readbrightly.com/kid-approved-books-for-advanced-fifth-sixth-grade-readers/?sid=302&mcg=205B0954107B37A9E0534FD66B0ACB03&ref=PRH0563577803&aid=randohouseinc13256-20&linkid=PRH0563577803&cdi=1D95E1A95D403DC8E0534FD66B0A14D9

______________________________

April/May 
Fantasy or Science Fiction 
(Including Dystopian Fiction)
Due May 16
Sign up by April 26.

The Assignment

2018 Symbolic Story Rep.doc

Symbolic Story Grading 8-3.doc





SSR for a scene from "The Smallest Dragonboy"
The question mark represents me as the reader,
with lots of questions about what will happen in this scene.
The brown shape is the setting since they live in an extinct volcano
and brown can symbolize home.
Characters:
The green figure is Keevan, the main character. I chose green because he is young and naive. 
"Naive" here means he believes what people tell him, even if he shouldn't.
The red character is Beterli  who is older and bigger than Keevan,
and is an angry bully.
The blue figures are Lessa and Mende, blue because they are power women
who are also good at calming situations.
Objects:
The black is the "black rock."  The spoon is Keevan's shovel.
I chose a spoon with red on it because it is dangerous
and Keevan is hurt by the shovel in a fight with Beterli.
The dragon eggs are yellow because of the hope they represent.
Theme: 
The redwood tree cones which are tiny and have tiny seeds represent the theme that no matter how small you are you can do great things.
A better theme for this particular theme would be represented by a
figure behind jail bars because cruelty (crime) doesn't pay. 


Video sample of an SRR -- Symbolic Story Representation
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgZVk612U90   about 3 minutes



Student Name ______________ Period ______ Date ________________
                                     (first and last, legible)

The book I have read is  _________________________________________
The author is _________________________________________________
The genre of the book is ______________________________.     It is _______ pages long.
For the genre, specify if it is fantasy, science fiction, or dystopian.

My scene is from pages ______ - _______  (or)
        My scene is from the     (circle one)  first third       middle third       last third    of the book.

I have finished reading my book.  Sign:  ____________________________________________

SYMBOLIC STORY REPRESENTATION EVALUATION
Teacher fills out during presentation.
5
4
3
0
Scoring:
5  = Outstanding
4  = Okay, Average
3  = Poor, not really prepared
0  = Missing




1. The student used effective symbolic representations (props) to represent the characters. 




2. The student used effective symbolic representations (props) to represent the setting.




3. The student used an effective symbolic representation (prop) to represent himself or herself as a reader.




4. The student clearly knew the scene well. (10 points)




5. The listener could clearly understand the characters and setting.




6. The reader cutout/prop was used in such a way that the listener understood what the reader did, noticed, felt, and thought as he or she read this story.       




7. Assessment planning/note pages completed and turned in with this sheet.  (10 points)




8. The top of this sheet was appropriately filled out by the student.




9. Student presented on day project was due, finished reading his/her book, and spoke very clearly. (10 points)




Total points per column:




Total points for the SSR:
                  /60
Comments:

-->

_____________________________


Nonfiction

The types of nonfiction you may use include biography, 
autobiography, and literary nonfiction. 
Your nonfiction book will be an informational book about a single subject ( not a how-to or self-help book)  and not a collection such as Guinness Book of World Records or Ripley's Believe It Or Not).  You may not use Eyewitness Books, either. 






Your nonfiction book will be an informational book about a single subject ( not a how-to or self-help book)  and not a collection such as Guinness Book of World Records or Ripley's Believe It Or Not).  You may not use Eyewitness Books, either. 

As usual, the book you choose needs to be a book at or near your reading level -- usually 100 below to 50 above lexile.

Find a topic you really would be interested in learning more about, and look for a book about that topic.

Suggested Books:

Recommended Nonfiction



DO NOT READ for Nonfiction
Diary of Anne Frank
Chasing Lincoln’s Killer

Phineas Gage*
Getting Away with Murder

The assignment:  Select a central idea from the book, 
and find evidence in the book for that idea.  




Finding the Central Idea Graphic Organizer.docx  -- this is the back of the rubric, and is for the neat final copy of the assignment. 

Example for Nonfiction Book of the Month








How to find literary nonfiction in the media center:
Go to: 
  1. Alexandria (On school website find Resources, find Alexandria on the drop-down menu.)
  2. Look at the left for a drop-down menu labeled "Smart Search."
  3. Click on Bibliographic.  
  4. Then type in Literary Nonfiction.     

or you could go to 

  1. Genre,
  2.  select a genre, 
  3. and select from the icons -  autobiography or biographies. 





 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
Last Month: 
Historical Fiction

Historical Fiction defined

Historical Fiction Books and Topics


 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
January 

Find  great historical fiction!
Learn about its nonfiction background.
Prepare to share!

Sign up by Jan.12.  Your project is due by January 30/31.   

Book of the Month: Historical Fiction

Jan BookoftheMonth 2018.docx


Share your Google Doc with the teacher, 
and print it after it has been approved by the teacher. 
Staple it to the top of the rubric, and hand it in. 
For your research
do not use Wikipedia or an "ask and answer" site. 
DO NOT use sites that are about the fictional book. 
Use reliable, nonfiction resources. 

Samples

Student Sample January/February Book of the Month


Still Another Example of the Historical Fiction Assignment



Rubric

Utah State Core -- Reading: Literature Standard 9 
Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period [or culture] as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.


List 5 true (nonfiction) facts you learned from reading this historical or multicultural fiction book. Explain each of those facts using two to five sentences. Cite a reliable source (online or print) to verify each fact.   Compare and contrast the effect on the reader (you) of learning about the same time period, event, person, or culture from the two different genres: fictional and nonfictional.
Title of book __________________________________________________________
Author _______________________________________________________________
Nonfiction time/place/or cultural setting of the book ____________________________
I read _____________ pages out of ________________ total pages.
Student gives the title, author, and length of the book.
 /5
Student signs the line below, indicating their completion of the book.
/5
Student lists 5 true (not fictional) facts the author used in the book.    Create a Google Doc and print it off to hand in -- stapled to the front of the rubric.

/10
Student has explained each fact in two to five sentences.

/10
For each fact presented, the student cites a reliable source (print or online).    Do not use Wikipedia or an ask and answer site. DO NOT use sites that are about the fictional book. 
/10
Student explains in one or two sentences what makes the book fictional.  (Usually at least some of the characters are fictional.)
/10
Student compares and/or contrasts the experience of reading fictional and nonfictional accounts of this same topic.
/10
The student has used grade-appropriate conventions: spelling, capitalization, punctuation, etc.
/5
Total:

/65

ACADEMIC HONESTY--By signing below, I am indicating that I read the book, and the information on this page is accurate:
X______________________________________________________________________________








********************************************
November/December
Realisitic Fiction Novel 



Choice/Independent Reading One Pager – Post-Reading: Character/Theme  

Genre:  Realistic Fiction, a book you haven’t read before, 100 pages or more, at your reading level, approved by teacher.       
                                                
The theme in a story is its underlying message, or 'big idea.' In other words, what important belief about life is the author trying to convey in the writing of a novel, play, short story or poem? This belief, or idea, transcends cultural barriers. It is usually universal in nature.

Use the page provided for taking notes on one or more themes in the book you read.  As part of your notes, collect quotes from the book that support the theme.  When ready, make an appointment,  and be prepared to talk with the teacher about your book, especially about a theme you identify in the book.   
Bring the page with you to your interview.
  Deadline for interview: December 12

Title of Book:__________________________    Author:____________________
Date Started/Date Completed:_______________ / _______________
Number of Pages:__________ Rating of Book (1-10):__________
Describe the character who changed the most from the beginning to the end of the book. Explain the change and what caused it.


-->
What was the author's purpose for showing this change? In other words, what is the theme? Explain yourself thoroughly here.







**********************************

Book of the Month Assignment
English 7 – Ms. Dorsey’s Classes

The Assignment:  This year, besides the books we read in class, you will each read two or more books per term.    You will have some time to read in class, but you will also need to read at home (and in the car, and while you’re waiting at the doctor’s office, and so on).   Most months I will assign a particular genre for you to read.   You will select from that genre a book that has 100 pages or more, have Ms. Dorsey approve it, read it, and report to an assigned group in class.  Bring the book or a picture of the front cover of the book on the due date.  Most of the books will be novels (fictional).
novel is a long narrative, normally in prose, which describes fictional characters and events, usually in the form of a sequential story.  – Google Search for “novel, definition, literature”

September/October  Book Project: 
Students will be graded on the completion of the book and their ability to discuss their novel in depth. 
Students need to be prepared to discuss several topics:
*summary of the book read  -- leaving out spoilers
*ranking it on a scale of 1-10 and  explaining why
* particular elements or aspects of literature that we are learning about in class
Where to find books:  school media center, classroom library, your home library, A.F. Library – or others, bookstores and used-book dealers, other stores. garage sales.





See the tab above for Required Reading to find links to lists of recommended books. 

1. September/October  Book Assignment
Date Due
Genre
Element or Aspect of Literature

October 10/11
We will hold the book discussions on these days.
Finish reading your book BEFORE your assigned day. 

Be able to summarize it and evaluate it.
Any Fictional
Genre
(a novel)
Character  and Conflict
      Who is the protagonist?
       Who is the antagonist?
What is the major conflict?
       Which type of conflict is it?
How does the protagonist change over the course of the book?   (Avoid Spoilers)
Does the antagonist change?
Types of conflict:
person vs. self
person vs. person
person vs. society
person vs. technology
person vs. nature
person vs. the unknown/supernatural











Recommended Books: Classics
http://www.readbrightly.com/classics-8-to-12-year-olds-say-are-worth-reading-today/?ref=PRH189A04CE2A&aid=randohouseinc38240-20&linkid=PRH189A04CE2A
Some of these are too "young" to read for an assignment. 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
2016 and Before
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Last Year: 

March/April


  • your choice of genre for a novel
  • one you haven't read yet
  • at your reading level (or at a seventh grade reading level)
  • at least 100 pages long

We will be looking at literary elements:
plot
conflict
character: protagonist, antagonist, how we learn about a character
setting
figurative language
theme
point of view/narrator





****************************

January/February

Historical Fiction or Multicultural Fiction

Helpful Links: 

About Historical Fiction

More Historical Fiction


           Here is the list of  Books Not Allowed for the Outside Reading Assignment.



Find  great historical fiction 
or multicultural fiction book! 

Complete the Book Assessment!



Sign up by Jan. 26/27.  Due by February 9/10    



Book of the Month: Historical or Multicultural Fiction

Share your Google Doc with the teacher, and print your assessment,
staple it to the top of the rubric, and hand it in. 
For your research
do not use Wikipedia or an ask and answer site. 
O NOT use sites that are about the fictional book. 
Use reliable, nonfiction resources. 


Utah State Core -- Reading: Literature Standard 9 
Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period [or culture] as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.
List 5 true (nonfiction) facts you learned from reading this historical or multicultural fiction book. Explain each of those facts using two to five sentences. Cite a reliable source (online or print) to verify each fact.   Compare and contrast the effect on the reader (you) of learning about the same time period, event, person, or culture from the two different genres: fictional and nonfictional.
Title of book __________________________________________________________
Author _______________________________________________________________
Nonfiction time/place/or cultural setting of the book ____________________________
I read _____________ pages out of ________________ total pages.
Student gives the title, author, and length of the book.
 /5
Student signs the line below, indicating their completion of the book.
/5
Student lists 5 true (not fictional) facts the author used in the book.    Create a Google Doc and print it off to hand in -- stapled to the front of the rubric.

/10
Student has explained each fact in two to five sentences.

/10
For each fact presented, the student cites a reliable source (print or online).    Do not use Wikipedia or an ask and answer site. DO NOT use sites that are about the fictional book. 
/10
Student explains in one or two sentences what makes the book fictional.  (Usually at least some of the characters are fictional.)
/10
Student compares and/or contrasts the experience of reading fictional and nonfictional accounts of this same topic.
/10
The student has used grade-appropriate conventions: spelling, capitalization, punctuation, etc.
/5
Total:

/65

ACADEMIC HONESTY--By signing below, I am indicating that I read the book, and the information on this page is accurate:
X______________________________________________________________________________







******************************

December Genre: Biography, Autobiography, or Narrative Nonfiction
Do not use historical fiction, or nonfiction which is about multiple subjects. 
Do not use how-to books. 

Due December 19/20

Sign up by December 7/8

DecemberBookofMonthRubric.docx 



Sample for book project  Sample for Nonfiction Book Project

More Examples for December Book of the Month -- Central Idea


The assignment: 
Determine a central idea from the book.
Write the central idea and list seven to ten pieces of evidence
 (with page number) that support that central idea. 

Reading: Informational Text Standard 2 

Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text
provide an objective summary of the text.

Nonfiction Books

See also the recommended books on our Scholastic Reading Club pages.
Your book of the month should be at least 100 pages long.
If you wish to read a shorter book, you may read 
       2 books all on the same subject that are 76-99 pages long,
       3 books all on the same subject that are 48 - 75 pages long,
       4 books all on the same subject that are 30 -47 pages long, 
         or create a combination of books of different lengths.
Do not select books that are mostly pictures. 
(There are many nonfiction books that are actually at your reading level, but are shorter in number of pages.)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *





 November Book of the Month
Due November 16/17
Select a book from the genre: 
Science Fiction or Fantasy

Your assignment will be about setting.  Notice the setting -- time and place -- of the main setting of your book.
How does the setting affect the characters and what happens in the book?

See more here:  Setting in a Novel




Fantasy and Science Fiction Novels


Defining Fantasy and Science Fiction

Genre? 
About Fantasy
  • Events occur outside the ordinary laws that operate within the universe.
  • Magic is central to the fantasy genre.
  • Fantasy stories often involve journeys and quests.

Science fiction is a genre of fiction in which the stories often tell about science and technology of the future. It may be set in space or on the Earth or another world.




           Here is the list of  Books Not Allowed for the Outside Reading Assignment.


************************



October Book of the Month
Select a book from this genre: 

Realistic Fiction in a Modern Setting


                    Here is the list of  Books Not Allowed for the Outside Reading Assignment.

You will be writing about how and why a character changes over the course of the book. 


Sign-Ups due by September 20/21.
   The book assessment will be given on October 12/13.

BookOMonthRubric2.docx

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 



Book of the Month: August/September

This month, you can choose any fictional novel that you’d like to read! We’ve announced this from the first day of class, so you should have been thinking about this already. The book should be:

-       Over 100 pages long
-       At a 7th grade level
-       A book you haven’t read before

You will be required to bring your book to class on Sept. 6 (A-Day) or Sept. 7 (B-Day) and sign up for it on our class list.  This gives you a week to start the book and make sure you really like it before you sign up. Start reading it now, even before you sign up!!

You will write an in-class essay about this book on Sept. 14 (A-Day) or Sept. 15 (B-Day). The prompt will ask you about internal and external conflicts in the book, so you may want to take notes about that as you read. An external conflict is a conflict that happens between characters, or between a character and an outside force. An internal conflict is a struggle that happens in the character’s mind.  We will discuss this more in class.


Here is a sample essay for this September Book of the Month assignment: 

Sample for September Book of the Month




Examples of Internal and External Conflict from The Outsiders
Internal Conflict:  
  • Ponyboy says he lies to himself all the time -- about not caring about Darrell, but he never believes himself. 
External Conflict:  
  • The Socs jump Ponyboy just because he is a Greaser.  There is an external  conflict between these two groups of teens.  
  • Ponyboy doesn't like Steve, his brother Soda's best friend.   There is an external conflict between the two of them.  Steve seems to feel that Ponyboy is just a kid, and resents it when Soda invites Ponyboy along when they are going someplace.  
  • Dallas is often getting picked up by the police.  There is an ongoing external conflict between Dallas and the law/law enforcement.  He creates conflict with others by jumping others -- even younger kids -- and by getting  into fights. 
Other examples of Internal Conflict: 
  •      A teen is always drinking alcohol or smoking, even though he/she knows it is not a good thing.
  •      A teen is trying to decide whether to shoplift something he/she wants a lot and doesn't have the money to buy. 
  •      A parent would like to get his/her daughter/son a cell phone because it would make it easier to keep in contact, but is worried that the child would waste too much time or access stuff the parent would rather the child not see.   So the parent is going back and forth in his/her mind between getting the phone and not getting it.  
Other examples of External Conflict: 
  •    The hero (protagonist) in the story has to fight against supernatural forces, such as in the Percy Jackson books. 
  •     The hero  (protagonist)  in the story is fighting for his/her life against the forces of nature, such as in Hatchet where he has to survive on his own in a wilderness. 
  •     The hero is battling technology, such as in The Hunger Games where many deadly traps have been built into the area using advanced technology.   Of course, there is also a main bad guy (President Snow), and most of the other young people in the area are also enemies to our protagonist.  


Happy reading!

literary conflict

The one that is internal conflict is a person vs. himself.








=====================================


Last Year =======================================
April

Historical Fiction
Sign up by April 28/29
Genre:  Historical Fiction,  DUE MAY 12/13  
at least 100 pages, your reading level, haven’t read before

April 2016 Book of the Month Instructions.docx



  • Your book assignment will be to find the "real deal" within your books.  
  • What are some facts you learn about the real setting, people, and situation by reading this book?   
  • You will be creating a top-ten list of facts and how you found out whether they were real or imagined.

NOT ON THE DO-NOT-READ LIST

About Historical Fiction


Here is the list of  Books Not Allowed for the Outside Reading Assignment.


English 7    April Book-of-the-Month       Genre:  Historical Fiction
Important Dates: Media Center April 26/27     Sign up by April 28/29       Due by May 12/13  
[Book: at least 100 pages,  grade/reading level appropriate, not read before, not on do-not-read list.]
Bring your historical fiction book to class each time.  You will have time to read in class.
·      Your book assignment will be to find the "real deal" within your books.  
·      What are some facts you learn about the real setting, people, and situation by reading this book?   
·      You will be creating a top-ten list of true facts and how you found out whether they were real or imagined. 
·      You will take notes on the page provided (yellow), or print your own from  April 2016 Book of the Month Instructions.docx or on lined paper.   You may do that on the hard copy or take your notes on the computer and hand them in by printing them or sending by email.
·      You will create your list as a poster (8 ½ x11 or larger), a prezi, a PowerPoint, a video, or Google Slides.   Include Ten True Facts, your sources, and three or more illustrations.
            - Your work must be neat and legible and include at least three illustrations that                                          contribute to or clarify the information presented. 
            -  PowerPoints, videos, Prezies, Google Docs or Google Slides will be emailed to Mrs. Dorsey.   Hard Copy Posters will be turned in in class. Due dates apply to all.
·      You will turn in this page with your notes when you turn in your list. 
·      For each item you think might be real, record what it is, whether it turned out to be real or imagined, and how you found out. 

·      As you take notes, include the “facts” you found out were NOT real, and where you looked to find out.

No Wikipedia, other wikis, blogs, or sites such as answer.com or ask.com.
The book itself does not count as a source.  
Neither do book reviews or summaries of the book.


Scoring:

You will receive 
5 points for each nonfiction (historically true) fact with the source where you found out it was real. Include the complete URL or book information;
10 points for your three or more illustrations that add to understanding of the facts; and 
10 points for handing in your notes page (originally the yellow paper).


Samples from projects:

Student Sample:
This student has gone above and beyond.
He does have some errors in conventions, though. 
Hunter D. April Book of the Month.pptx

Sample from Ms.Dorsey


March

April 12/13:  If you did not follow the directions before you handed in your assignment, study the information below AND study this post, too:

More Examples for the March Book of the Month


Sign up for your book by March 21 (at the latest March 25).

Our March book of the month will be nonfiction. 
This can include biography, autobiography, 
and literary nonfiction.
How to find literary nonfiction in the media center:
Go to: 
  1. Alexandria (On school website find Resources, find Alexandria on the drop-down menu.)
  2. Look at the right for a drop-down labeled "Simple."
  3. Change Simple to Advanced.
  4. Click on Bibliography. 
  5. Then type in Literary Nonfiction.

This post explains what Nonfiction Books are, and lists some recommendations. 



Click on the link then click on the Download tab to access it. 



March Book of the Month: Nonfiction  
     Your task is to keep track of how individuals, ideas, and events interact in your nonfiction book.  You are looking for ways that one influences the other(s).  How does an individual influence events or ideas?  How do events influence an individual or group?  How do ideas influence an individual or group?   As you read, list as many of these interactions as you can.

My book’s title is ____________________________
The author is ___________________________________ # of pages: _____
Page
Individual, idea, event, setting, situation that is influencing or affecting something else
Individual, idea, event, setting, situation that being influenced or affected
How is the one influencing or affecting the other?
Examples from The Notorious Benedict Arnold by Steve Sheinkin
8-9
Yellow Fever -- Event
Two of Benedict Arnold’s sisters die from yellow fever
Benedict -- Individual
Benedict’s show-off behavior becomes more extreme.
 Benedict became more of a daredevil, doing dangerous things, seemingly to show that death couldn’t easily take him.
26-39
Benedict -- Individual 
Benedict wanted to capture the cannons at Fort Ticonderoga for the Americans fighting the British.
American government leaders -- Individuals
The Massachusetts Committee of Safety was in charge of the Americans fighting the British at Boston.
Benedict convinced them to send him to gather soldiers and capture Fort Ticonderoga, so he becomes a military leader.


Examples from How They Croaked
67+
Mozart's Father -- Individual
Mozart's father was a musician himself.
Mozart -- Individual
Mozart's musical abilities and how they were used were affected by his father.
 Mozart learned to play by watching his father teach his sister.  His father encouraged his talents and took him and his sister on tour when he was young.
Mozart became famous at an early age.
135+
Darwin --  Individual
Darwin came up with his theory about evolution.


Ideas (Scientific Thinking) 

Eventually his theories became the generally accepted way scientists looked at the development of life on earth
127+
Situation --
The president at the time did not have any type of guards.


James A. Garfield -- Individual

Garfield was shot and eventually died as a result of the wound. 
127+
Ideas --
Doctors  did not understand the need to wash their hands. 


James A. Garfield -- Individual 

Garfield's gunshot wound became infected because the doctors poked around in it with dirty fingers.  He died as a result of infection.



 
Examples from Knucklehead by Jon Scieszka

 Individual, idea, event, setting, situation that is influencing or affecting something else
 Individual, idea, event, setting, situation that being influenced or affected
 How is the one influencing or affecting the other?
 pg. 19
 Jon Scieszka as a boy
 His brother Jim
Jim liked to argue -- and to trick Jon
 Because Jon argued back --- which often let to wrestling -- he says he made Jim better at arguing, so when he grew up Jim was a better lawyer because of Jon (according to Jon).




   Examples from An American Plague 
 pg 1
 It was hot in the summer of 1793.
 the swamps marshes and rivers --------------------------
dead fish ----------------------
 insects including mosquitoes --------------------

 dried up
rotted and stunk

increased in numbers 







From Vampires by Stephen Krensky9-10
Page
Individual, idea, event, setting, situation that is influencing or affecting something else
Individual, idea, event, setting, situation that being influenced or affected
How is the one influencing or affecting the other?
9-10
Human nature
affects what people believe
People want to explain why people die in their sleep or why some people act so strangely, so they use the idea of vampires to explain those things.
26-27
A real life count in the country of Transylvania named Vlad Tepes whose father was known as the dracul (the dragon), so he was the son of the dragon or in their language, Dracula
Vlad was cruel to his many enemies.  Over six years he impaled thousands of people on wooden stakes and left them to die.


 This was very hard on his enemies, and make people fear him. 




6-27
There was a real life count in the country of Transylvania named Vlad Tepes whose father was known as the dracul (the dragon), so he was the son of the dragon or in their language, Dracula

An author named Bram Stoker heard about him.

Stoker used the location and the name Dracula when he wrote his book about a vampire -- even though Vlad Tepes was not like a vampire.


Examples from Idaho – Thank you to Anne C.




p. 14-15
The Spanish brought horses to Idaho
Changed the Native Americans’ life
They lived longer and they were able to hunt easier.
p. 40
One of  Idaho’s dams is the American Falls Dam on the Snake River
The people of American Falls City had to be moved.
The reservoir created by the dam now covers the town except for the grain elevator that stands very tall.
The Old Town of American Falls --  1920's
The Old Town of American Falls -- about 1920's
The town was moved to higher ground, a dam built, and the area where the town had been became a reservoir.


When I was a child, the water level became very low,
and we went to explore what was left of the old town.
It was spooky and magical to a child.





Utah State Core   --  Reading: Informational Text Standard 3 


Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).            Key Words: analyze, interactions, influence

Definition of Analysis:  an investigation of the component parts of a whole and their relationships in making up the whole    Definition of Component:  a part of a larger whole


___________________
There will be no February Book of the Month.
We are still concentrating on writing in February.
There will be no January Book of the Month.
We will concentrate on writing in January.

However, here is a great list of recommended books to read -- just for fun: http://imaginationsoup.net/best-books-12-year-olds/

Our next books for a book of the month will be nonfiction. 

How to find literary nonfiction in the media center:
Go to: 
  1. Alexandria (On school website find Resources, find Alexandria on the drop-down menu.)
  2. Look at the right for a drop-down labeled "Simple."
  3. Change Simple to Advanced.
  4. Click on Bibliography. 
  5. Then type in Literary Nonfiction.

This post explains what Nonfiction Books are, and lists some recommendations. 



_________________________________
December 
December -- Fantasy or Science Fiction novel
Element or Aspect of Literature: Setting
How would the story be different if it were placed in a different setting -- our time and place? the past? if in the future, a different future setting?
How does the setting influence the characters and the plot?
December 13/14
EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY + AN OPPORTUNITY TO WIN FAME AND FORTUNE! (WIN A CONTEST AND SOME DOLLARS)
and see page 17 for a rubric.
You may do this in place of your book of the month for December.  
Hand them in by December 14/15.                                                     


November -- Your choice of genre of novel
Element or Aspect of Literature:  Point of View
   Notice who is telling the story.  See the point of view chart in your composition book.
November 19/20
 November Book of the Month.docx 

December -- Fantasy or Science Fiction novel
Element or Aspect of Literature: Setting
How would the story be different if it were placed in a different setting -- our time and place?  the past? if in the future, a different future setting? 

How does the setting influence the characters and the plot?

 “Fantasy gives us this imagination, this power, this wonder, alongside real human problems, and it mixes all these things together in a package that is fun and readable and interesting,” [Brandon Sanderson] explains. “It grabbed me, and that’s when I decided I was going to be a fantasy writer—and I started writing.”
from alumni.byu.edu/writing-epic-proportions



October book discussions will be held on October 20/21. 


2. October Book Assignment
Date Due
Genre
Element or Aspect of Literature

October 20/21
Realistic Fiction
(a novel)
 Theme – Determine one or more themes in your book and be able to defend your choice(s) using passages from the book.
(Theme is the main idea of the story, the discovery about life that we take away from the story, stated as a complete sentence.)

More About Theme


Here is how you will be graded:
1
3
5
Student was unprepared to discuss the book.  (It seems as if student didn’t read the book or read it carefully.)
Student could give a basic summary of the book but struggled to discuss the book in depth. (it seems as if the reading was rushed through or skimmed, summary sounded like the summary on the back of the book)
Student discussed their book with ease and in depth.  Great detail was provided to the group. Student covered the assigned element or aspect of literature.
Student brought the book or a picture of the cover.  

__________________________________________




Book of the Month Assignment
English 7 – Ms. Dorsey’s Classes

The Assignment:  This year, besides the books we read in class, you will each read two books per term.    You will have some time to read in class, but you will also need to read at home (and in the car, and while you’re waiting at the doctor’s office, and so on).   Most months I will assign a particular genre for you to read.   You will select from that genre a book that has 100 pages or more, have Ms. Dorsey approve it, read it, and report to an assigned group in class.  Bring the book or a picture of the front cover of the book on the due date.  Most of the books will be novels (fictional).

novel is a long narrative, normally in prose, which describes fictional characters and events, usually in the form of a sequential story.  Google Search for “novel, definition, literature”

Students will be graded on the completion of the book and their ability to discuss their novel in depth. 
Students need to be prepared to discuss several topics:
*summary of the book read  -- leaving out spoilers
*ranking it on a scale of 1-10 and why
* particular elements or aspects of literature that we are learning about in class

Where to find books:  school media center, classroom library, your home library, A.F. Library – or others, bookstores and used-book dealers, other stores. garage sales.

1. September Book Assignment
Date Due
Genre
Element or Aspect of Literature

September 23/24
We will hold the book discussions on these days.
Any Fictional
Genre
(a novel)
Character  and Conflict
      Who is the protagonist?
       Who is the antagonist?
What is the major conflict?
       Which type of conflict is it?
How does the protagonist change over the course of the book?   (Avoid Spoilers)
Does the antagonist change?
Types of conflict:
person vs. self
person vs. person
person vs. society
person vs. technology
person vs. nature
person vs. the unknown/supernatural
2. October Book Assignment
Date Due
Genre
Element or Aspect of Literature

October 20/21
Realistic Fiction
(a novel)
 Theme – Determine one or more themes in your book and be able to defend your choice(s) using passages from the book.
(Theme is the main idea of the story, the discovery about life that we take away from the story, stated as a complete sentence.)

More About Theme


Here is how you will be graded:
1
3
5
Student was unprepared to discuss the book.  (It seems as if student didn’t read the book or read it carefully.)
Student could give a basic summary of the book but struggled to discuss the book in depth. (it seems as if the reading was rushed through or skimmed, summary sounded like the summary on the back of the book)
Student discussed their book with ease and in depth.  Great detail was provided to the group. Student covered the assigned element or aspect of literature.
Student brought the book or a picture of the cover.  

__________________________________________

Summer Reading Suggestions -- 2015


For the 2015-2016 School Year -- 
Students will be required to read two books per term -- about one a month, and complete a book assessment based on that book.  The book assessments provide  the student  the opportunity to show mastery of  essential skills and knowledge.  

Some time is given in class for reading the book, but students will also need to read outside of class.  
Also, if the assessment is not completed in class, it too becomes homework. 

Most of the required books will be novels, though some will be nonfiction.  Students will select their own books,  usually from a genre specified by the teacher.  The first book of the year will be a novel  (a fictional book, like a "chapter book" but appropriately advanced for  junior high students)  in any novel genre. 

Some Fictional Genres 
realistic, fantasy, science fiction, mystery, horror, 
historical, multicultural, classic, action/adventure, romance, humor




List of Recommended Books:   Find more information about selecting books for your Book-of-the-Month at   http://cavemanenglish.pbworks.com/Recommended-Books


Here is the list of  Books Not Allowed for the Outside Reading Assignment.



Not required, but highly recommended: 
 Battle of the Books -- Special Opportunity


Lexile Levels:

Grade
Band
"Stretch"
Lexile Band*
 K–1
N/A
 2–3
420L–820L
 4–5
740L–1010L
 6–8
925L–1185L
9-10
1050L–1335L
11–CCR
1185L–1385L